Monday, April 23, 2018


GEORGE BULLOUGH - WORLD TOUR 1892-1895  
YARRALUMLA  AND  RIVERINA 
BACK STATIONS  -  AUSTRALIA
Article 18 of 28   *  Published in the Accrington Gazette on the 12th of September 1896
Time of visit: June 1893

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Article eighteen continues the description of the 1892-1895 world tour made by
George Bullough, (later Sir George, Baronet of Rum, Scotland) and his companion,
Robert Mitchell, published in a series of twenty-eight articles by Mitchell published
in the local Lancashire newspaper the Accrington Gazette in 1896.

PLEASE NOTE: Certain terms in the Gazette article are unacceptable today.
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20 Volume Record of George Bullough’s World Tour.
George W. Randall Research and Photographic Archive
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Written from first-hand research and illustrated with a personal selection of photographs 
from the albums in the Library at Kinloch Castle, Isle of Rum, Scotland.
George W. Randall Archive ©
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Junee Junction Rail Station c.1890.
Bullough and Mitchell took a stagecoach to Yass catching the train to Junee and on to
Darlington, the nearest station to their destination, a further 35 miles ... ...
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MobileMarshies

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ARTICLE NINETEEN CONTINUES THE RIVERINA OUT-STATION VISITS
-  TOGGERMAIN  AND GROUNDAL

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POSTED BY GEORGE W. RANDALL 23 APRIL 2018

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Wednesday, April 18, 2018

GEORGE BULLOUGH - WORLD TOUR 1892-1895  
 SYDNEY / YARRALUMLA / AUSTRALIA
 Article 17 of 28   *  Published in the Accrington Gazette on the 5th of September 1896
Time of visit: June 1893
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TOWN HALL, SYDNEY
INTERIOR OF TOWN HALL  SHOWING GRAND ORGAN  SYDNEY
Album VII * Images 31 and 32 * Size of each 8½ x 6 inches 
Original photographs by Charles Bayliss, Photographer, Sydney.
George W. Randall Research and Photographic Archive
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20 Volume Record of George Bullough’s World Tour.
George W. Randall Research and Photographic Archive

Written from first-hand research and illustrated with a personal selection of photographs 
from the albums in the Library at Kinloch Castle, Isle of Rum, Scotland.
George W. Randall Archive ©

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Article seventeen continues the description of the 1892-1895 world tour made by
George Bullough, (later Sir George, Baronet of Rum, Scotland) and his companion,
Robert Mitchell, published in a series of twenty-eight articles by Mitchell published
in the Lancashire newspaper the Accrington Gazette in 1896.

SYDNEY  - WATSON’S BAY
Album VII * Image 23 * Edited from size 8 x 6 inches
Original numbered 282.  Charles Bayliss, Photographer, Sydney, embossed on image.

(George W. Randall Research and Photographic Archive).

Watson’s Bay is located seven miles north-east of Sydney close to the entrance promontory
to Sydney Harbour called South Head. In 1788 when the First Fleet arrived in Australia 
the area was home to the indigenous Cadigal aborigine, remaining an isolated 
fishing village until development began in the 1860’s so that today it is a 
popular residential and recreational location.
Sydney Harbour Map
Australian Museum, Sydney

Watson’s Bay is named after Robert Watson from Northumberland, England, who, as quartermaster of the 
First Fleet flagship, Siriuslanded in Sydney Cove in January 1788 aged thirty-two. After several more years at sea and time spent on Norfolk Island, he married and settled in Sydney, becoming pilot harbourmaster and lighthouse keeper.
In 1801 he was granted 50 acres of land at South Head, now known as Watson’s Bay.
Robert Watson died in his home near Sydney in November 1819.
The original photograph was taken by Charles Bayliss, born at the town of Hadleigh, Suffolk, England in 1850. His father, also called Charles, a saddler, and mother, Elizabeth, n√©e Gardiner,  emigrated to Melbourne, Australia, in 1852 when their son was two years old.
In 1866 travelling photographer, Henry Beaufoy Merlin called 
at the Bayliss home with his horse drawn caravan/dark room in 
the hope of selling some of his pictures. Merlin was proprietor of the American & Australian Photographic Company and  sixteen year old Charles was so fascinated by this infant technology,  
(the collodion process captured the image on a glass plate), 
that Mr. Merlin offered him a position as his apprentice, 
later becoming his assistant. The pair spent the next four years touring Victoria and New South Wales photographing every 
home and building and offering them for sale.
In 1870, after setting up a studio in Sydney, the pair resumed their photographic wanderings during which they captured amazing images of the gold fields, particularly the New South Wales gold towns of Hill End, 
and Gulgong, respectively 173 and 190 miles north-west of Sydney.
Henry Merlin died on the 27th September 1873 and twenty-three year old Bayliss returned to Melbourne. The same year he took a series of photographs of Ballarat including a 360 degree panorama. This brought his work to the attention of politician, gold miner and businessman, Bernard Otto Holtermann who had emigrated to Australia from Germany at the age of twenty in 1858.  In 1875, under Holtermann's patronage, Bayliss took a 360 degree panorama of Sydney. 
The 36 x 63 inch wet plate view of Sydney was exhibited at the Philadelphia Centennial International Exhibition the same year where it received a bronze medal.
In 1876 the Bayliss family moved to Sydney where Charless photographic experience allowed him to successfully establish a studio at 348, George Street. 
Seven years later he married Christiana Salierthey had five sons and two daughters.
During the 1880’s Bayliss travelled to Queensland taking panoramic views around Maryborough, 159 miles from Brisbane. In 1886 he was appointed official photographer 
to the Royal Commission on Water Conversation during which he photographed large 
stretches of Australia's third longest river, the 914 mile long Darling River.

On the 4th of June 1897, aged only forty-seven , Charles Bayliss died after catching a chill 
which quickly turned to pneumonia, his eldest child, Raymond, only thirteen, 
his youngest, Eric, barley one year old.
Recognised as one of Australia’s most accomplished landscape photographers.
Charles Bayliss is remembered through his photographs,
an enduring record of life in Australia in the late nineteenth century.
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POST OFFICE SYDNEY
Album VII * Image 30 * Size 8 x 6 inches 
Charles Bayliss, Photographer, Sydney, embossed on image.
George W. Randall Research and Photographic Archive

Designed by Scottish born Colonial Architect, James Johnstone Barnet, 1827-1904 and constructed between 1866 and 1891 of local Sydney sandstone the building is considered “the finest example of Victorian Italian Renaissance architecture in New South Wales.”
Almost 380 feet in length it remains one of the largest sandstone edifices in the city.
During World War II the clock tower was taken down as it posed a landmark for an air attack. 
It was re-built in 1964 at which time the word “Eternity” was found written in chalk inside the bell,  but that is a story all on its own!

DETAIL FROM 
POST OFFICE SYDNEY
Album VII * Image 30
George Street showing the premises 
of  C. Collins, Photographer, and
Hippolyte Felix Delarue & Co., 
watchmaker, Jewellers, Silversmiths 
& Opticians378 George Street 
– sign left of big clock. 
After leaving school at age sixteen James Barnet moved to London where he became apprenticed to a builder and studied drawing under the distinguished Scottish artist, Professor William Dyce and architect and inventor Charles 
J. Richardson, F.R.I.B.A., whilst serving as clerk of works to London’s Worshipful Company of Fishmongers.
Aged twenty-seven he married and sailed to Australia with his wife landing in Sydney in December 1854, where he worked for English born architect and builder 
Edmund Thomas Blacket.

Blacket, a pioneer of the revival styles of architecture, particularly Victorian Gothic, is best known for designing the University of Sydney and 
St. Andrew’s Cathedral.

In 1860, aged thirty-three, Barnet joined the Colonial 
Architect’s Office in Sydney and within two years was 
acting head. In 1865 he was promoted Colonial Architect,
 a position he held until 1890.
Sadly his wife, Rosa, died the same year. 

James Barnet had little time for, and was highly 
critical of, the new styles of architecture which were becoming fashionable in Sydney during the late 
19th century. He died in 1904 being survived by three sons and four daughters.


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The watchmaking, jewellery business of
H. F. DELARUE
Hippolyte Felix Ferdinand Delarue
was established in George Street, 
Sydney in 1850.
Mr. Delarue arrived in Sydney
in 1840 from Berck, 
Normandy, France.

Royal Australian Air Force Commodore Hippolyte Ferdinand Delarue, C.B.E., D.F.C., born 1891, died 1977, was the grandson of jeweler H. F. Delarue.




In 1899 James Barnet, R.I.B.A., published a paper titled,
Architectural Work in Sydney, New South Wales, 1788-1899.  
(It can be viewed on Google - 
The Journal of the Royal Institute of British Architects, Volume 6, page 505 - published 1899)


BRICK STORE CUM CHURCH

Sydney’s first place of worship was erected at the
expense of Yorkshire born the Reverend Richard
Johnson, the first Christian cleric in Australia
and completed on the 25th of August 1793.
Rev. Johnson and his wife arrived
with the First Fleet in January 1788.
Constructed of strong posts, wattles and
plaster, it was here on the 6th of May 1798
that Elizabeth Beckford married fellow
convict Abraham Lee.*
Within a few months it was burnt down,
suspicion falling on a convict or convicts who
were compelled to attend or lose privileges.
The building illustrated above, just completed
for use as a brick store, was immediately
requisitioned and fitted out as a church.

* See Article 16 in this series.
The article by James Barnet includes this drawing of the first church in Sydney dated 1846 by Joseph Fowles.*

In July 1793, five years after the foundation of the Colony, Lieutenant Governor Major Francis Grose laid the foundation stone for 
St. Phillips, the first stone church built in the Colony. Although not consecrated until the 25th of December 1810 it had been 
used as a place of public worship since 1797. King George III presented a silver communion service. 
The church was demolished in 1856.


* Joseph Fowles arrived in Sydney on the 31st of August 1838 from Gloucestershire, England, with his wife, Sarah, after a voyage of five months. He is best remembered for his publication Sydney in 1848 in which Fowles wished and indeed does capture the city as it really was. His accurate drawings and accompanying descriptions make it a unique and valuable resource of Sydney sixty years after the arrival of the First Fleet
in January 1788.

To view Joseph Fowles’ Sydney in 1848

go to:
Sydney in 1848 – Project Gutenberg Australia

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MANLY BEACH, SYDNEY HARBOUR
Album VII * Image 24 * Edited from size 8 x 6 inches
No. 282 Manly Beach. Charles Bayliss, Photographer, Sydney - embossed on image.
George W. Randall Research and Photographic Archive


 As First Fleet Commander, Captain Phillip explored the northern reaches of Port Jackson 
in January 1788, he came across a long golden sandy beach in a sheltered bay. 
Upon landing he met a party of native Aborigine, the Kuringgai people who fished and 
hunted in the surrounding bush-land trading with their neighbours. 
Their confident demeanor and manly interaction so impressed
Captain Phillip he named the place Manly Cove.

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SYDNEY  - PARRAMATTA RIVER AND BERRY'S BAY
Album VII * Image 27 * Edited from size 8 x 6 inches
Original by J. P. (John Paine)
George W. Randall Research and Photographic Archive

Berry’s Bay lies along the north shore of Sydney Harbour, almost opposite Circular Quay.
In the early 1800’s Alexander Berry and Edward Wollstonecraft constructed a stone wharf,
stone warehouse together with worker’s cottages and huts “for maritime purposes” leasing
 the site as a repair and storage facility and coaling depot to shipping lines, including Orient.
Between 1872 and 1880 a distillery serving hotels in Sydney operated from one of the storehouses. Around this time the site was rented to the New South Wales Torpedo Corps
as a depot for the defence of Sydney.
Prior to the opening of the Sydney Harbour Bridge in 1932 boat building and
repair yards flourished along the north shore.

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The original image was photographed by John Paine, born in England in 1833.
Emigrating to New South Wales in his early thirties he worked as a photographer
in the town of Tamworth, 260 miles north of Sydney.
In 1875, following his marriage to Mary Baker in Tamworth
the previous year, the couple moved to Sydney where he established his own
photographic studio at 96 Elizabeth Street, Sydney.
Paine exhibited at the Sydney International Exhibition in 1879 winning
a silver medal and later in Amsterdam, Calcutta and London.
He recorded the establishment of the British Protectorate over south-east New Guinea in 1883 when the Government of Queensland annexed the territory for the British Empire.
His images reflect his skill in composition and at capturing the atmosphere of his subject.

Paine died in Australia in 1908.
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TOWN HALL, SYDNEY 
Album VII * Image 31 
Edited from original 8½ x 6 inches  *  Image by Charles Bayliss, Photographer, Sydney.
(George W. Randall Research and Photographic Archive)

The horses and carriages are standing in Druitt Street, in front of Sydney Town Hall. 
Behind the carpentry, joinery and show-case making business of (Marx C.) 
Muhs & Harder65, Druitt Street and carriage business of Charles Aaron, Carriage Proprietor.



Rofe’s Police Office Hotel facing onto York Street owned by Mr. J. Rofe.
Entrance to The Glasgow Temperance Hotel “Good Beds  -  Meals 4d.”

In the middle of the 19th century there was already an “ancient house at the corner of
York and Druitt Street, known as the Odd Woodman kept by Mrs. Louisa Watkins.”
This corner property “was well frequented on Court mornings, and there were sittings
every morning. It was afterwards known as the Police Office Hotel and among its many
landlords was Mr. John Rofe who (had) an extensive family connection with law and
lawyers and bricks and mortar in Sydney and suburbs.”
                                                                                                                                                                               Truth 6 April 1902

  In the image above, taken c.1889, the hotel was under the management of “A. W. Sharland.”

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TOWN HALL, SYDNEY
Album VII * Images 31* Size 8½ x 6 inches 
Original photograph by Charles Bayliss, Photographer, Sydney.
George W. Randall Research and Photographic Archive.

GEORGE STREET, SYDNEY Album VII * Image 29 
Edited from original 8 x 6 inches image by Charles Bayliss, Photographer, Sydney. No. 622
(George W. Randall Research and Photographic Archive)

The horse-drawn omnibuses operated by T. Brady.

Detail from  Town Hall, Sydney, photograph by Charles Bayliss.


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INTERIOR OF TOWN HALL    SHOWING GRAND ORGAN    SYDNEY
Album VII * Image 32 * Size 8½ x 6 inches 
Original photograph by Charles Bayliss, Photographer, Sydney.
George W. Randall Research and Photographic Archive.

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REFERENCES:

Australian Museum, Sydney website
Immigration Place website
Obituaries Australia
George W. Randall Research and Photographic Archive 1992 - 2018
Sydney Morning Herald - 20 January 1868
AcKowledge Consulting - Delarue
The Watchmaker, Jeweller and Silversmith - 5 December 1875
The Journal of the Royal Institute of British Architects, Volume 6 - 1899)
Johns's Notable Australians - Who's Who in Australia - Fred Johns 
                        Encyclop√¶dia of Nineteenth Century Photography - John Hannavy 2007
Project Gutenberg - Australia
New South Wales Government State Archives and Records
                                                                                      
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POSTED WEDNESDAY 18 APRIL 2018

GEORGE W. RANDALL RESEARCH AND PHOTOGRAPHIC ARCHIVE   ©