Tuesday, November 30, 2021

 

KINLOCH CASTLE  - ISLE OF RUM DEER FOREST

Written from first-hand research by George W. Randall and illustrated from his photographic archive which includes full reproduction of the three Game Books.

Map from Scottish Natural Heritage - Rum Place Names Map.

                                               “RHUM  1879”.

This 1879 mounted head pre-dates the Isle of Rum Deer Forest book records by nine years and was most certainly one of the first, if not the first shot by John Bullough, Sir Georges father, who commenced renting the sporting rights on the island in 1879 from the then owner, Farquhar Campbell who had purchased the island in 1870 from the 3rd Marquis of Salisbury. 

Despite numerous requests by Bullough to buy the island, Campbell refused to sell. However, following Campbells death Rum was inherited by his cousin James Hunter Campbell who in 1886, decided to sell by auction.

On 15 June 1886 John Bullough bought the island for £35,000. 

(£35,000 in 1886 is equivalent in purchasing power to over £4.7 million in 2021 - CPI Inflation Calculator.)

One of three leather bound Isle of Rum Deer Forest record books, (Deer, Fish and Game), each with gilt lettering recording the successes of Sir George and Lady Bullough and their guests during the respective annual Game Season on their 26,400 acre Highland island estate off the west coast of Scotland.

THE GUESTS included relatives of Camilla, Duchess of Cornwall; Sir Winston Churchill; the 7thDuke of Marlborough; American banker Walter Hayes Burns;  American  financier and banker John Pierpont Morgan; William Edward Harcourt 2nd Viscount Harcourt managing director and later chairman investment bankers Morgan, Grenfell & Co; and Sir Ivor Guest son of Welsh industrialist Ivor Bertie Guest (First Baron Wimbourne) of  leading British multinational automotive and aerospace company GKN, Guest, Keen and Nettlefold, Ltd; amongst many others!

*

    However, not all deer shot are recorded!      

See September 1909.

Opening page of Kinloch Castle - Isle of Rum Deer Forest record book.

The three volumes are a unique and valuable resource recording be it only the successful guests” to a Highland Sporting Estate in the late 19th early 20th century. 

The Great Hall at Kinloch Castle never fails to impress.

The mounted heads of the five best stags killed before World War I are displayed in the Great Hall.  Kinloch Castle was not completed until 1900, previously Sir George and his guests would have stayed in Kinloch Lodge, (built during the ownership of Lord Salisbury - father of the Victorian Prime Minister,  Robert Gascoyne-Cecil, 3rd Marquess of Salisbury and demolished on completion of Kinloch Castle), or on-board his 857 ton ocean-going steam yacht, Rhouma moored in Loch Scresort, the islands only sea loch and safe anchorage that fronts the raised beach on which the Castle was built.


   The island of Rum at 26,400 acres is the largest of the Small Isles and lies 16½ miles from the ferry port of Mallaig off the west coast of Scotland.
*

“Finest Head Killed on Rhum” before World War 1.

         13 point Red Deer (Cervus elaphus), stag shot after a 3 hour 10 minute stalk by Sir George Bullough on 24 September 1910 at Ardneamh (Àrd Neabh) using a .303 calibre gun.   

Clean weight: 19 stone 6-lbs. (272-lbs). 

Average clean weight of the nineteen killed in 1910: 15 stone (210-lbs.)



   1910 Sep 24th.    Sir George Bullough    Ardneamh          Jac. Macaskill             13  19  6  .303   Finest head killed at Rhum
                                                                                                                                                            (average 15 stones 1910)
                                                                                                                                                    Weight of heaviest stag 19st. 6-lbs.


* * *  +  *  +   * * * 

15 point stag shot by Sir George Bullough on Beinn nan Stac, Glen Dibidil, on 25 September 1912 using .303 calibre rifle.* Stalker Don. McGillivray.

“A good head on an animal in poor condition.

* Sir George owned a pair of double-barreled guns made by James Purdey & Sons. 


THE RUT
September 20 is the traditional day of The Roaring and the start of  when stags move out of bachelor herds and disperse increasing the guns chance of a stalk. The stags round-up hinds and, when necessary, fight to keep rivals at bay. 
Darwinian theory of evolution: survival of the fittest. During this period the stags are much easier to approach. By October 20 it is usually all over.

1888 SEASON.

The Isle of Rum Deer Forest book commences on 26 December 1888 with a six point stag shot  in Harris Valley with a .450 rifle by eighteen year old George Bullough. 
William Bullough, Georges uncle, shot his deer three days later in Glen Shellesder.

It is strange to note that although the island was purchased in June 1886 by John Bullough, Georges father, who had been renting the sporting rights since 1879, his name does not appear as a successful gun in the 1888 Deer Forest book  up to his death in February 1891.

1889 SEASON.

The 1889 Stalking Season commenced on 11 October with an eight point stag shot by Tom Bullough, a grandson of James Bullough (founder of  the family business, Messrs. Howard & Bullough, Globe Works, Accrington, Lancashire, cotton machinery manufacturers) and brother of  John Bullough, Georges father. Following the latter's death in 1891, until he retired in 1904, Tom Bullough was Chairman of the company. 

The remaining deer in 1889 were shot by William Bullough (son of James) and George Bullough, the island at this time being owned by Georges father, John Bullough. (The last deer, an eight pointer, was killed on 24 December in Harris Valley by George.)

1890 SEASON.

With John Bullough becoming increasingly unwell in 1890, the grazing tenant, Mr. Martin, is recorded as being the only gun shooting that season with eighteen  stags recorded in the Game Book, stalker Peter McLean. 

1891/2/3 SEASONS.

John Bullough died unexpectedly on 25 February 1891, three days short of son George's twenty-first birthday. In his Will he left the island of Rum and a half interest in the business to George, now a very wealthy young man with a six figure income from his share dividend in Howard & Bullough, still a private company with two thousand employees. Within a year George embarked on a three year long world tour and upon his return purchased the steam yacht Maria, which he renamed Rhouma and commissioned the building of Kinloch Castle 1897-1900. 

The guns in 1891 and 1892 were G. D. Bowlby, Esq., Captain Jeffrey and Captain Lynch. James Bullough shot in the last stalk of the 1892 Season on 29 December, a ten pointer in Glen Shellesder with a .450 rifle.

From the opening entry, 26 October 1888 to and including 15 October 1892 the stalker was Peter McLean, a total of fifty-two. He does not appear again.

Other named stalker: John Ashworth (21 and 29 December 1892)

With George Bullough away on his world tour, the 1893 Season entry records seven stags killed, the guns being Mr. William and Mr. James Bullough, with Malcolm Sinclair and John Ashworth, (both also stalkers), all using .450 calibre rifles. 

1894 SEASON

1 January (culled due to injury) and 5 September to 13 October 1894 records fourteen stags killed: John Ashworth (7), Mr. Tom Bullough (2), Mr. Rutherford (1), Mr. Cole (2), Mr. Shorrock (2). Stalkers: John Ashworth and Malcolm Sinclair.

1895 SEASON.

Late 1895 saw the return from his world tour of George Bullough, accompanied by his travelling companion, Robert Mitchell. On 27 September he killed a ten point stag (one of nineteen that year) at Bridenoch with a .450 rifle, stalker Malcolm Sinclair.  

1896 SEASON.

The 1896 Season commenced on 14 August and ran until 28 December. George Bullough shot a ten point stag on the first day in Glen Shellesder, stalker John Ashworth, and two more, on 13 and 16 October, respectively a nine pointer in Sandi Corrie, and an eight pointer in a deer drive in Guirdil Glen, all using .405 calibre rifle. A total of twenty-four stags being recorded in the Game Book. 

In difficult terrain ponies were and in many cases still are the best and only means of transporting dead deer. Here a pony is led across a stream close to Welshman’s Rock where the ground slopes away steeply before plunging three hundred feet to the sea.

1897 SEASON.

The first stag in 1897, a six pointer was shot on 2 January at Dibidil by stalker Malcolm Sinclair due to it having a broken leg.

The Season commenced 10 August, George Bullough accounting for six of the twenty-eight further stags recorded.

On 13 September, George’s half-brother, ten year old “Master Ian Bullough” shot his first stag at Gorsten, a nine pointer weighing sixteen stone (224-lbs.) with a .450 rifle; stalker Malcolm Sinclair. He shot his second stag, the last that year, on 31 December in Black Corrie (Bare Corrie) on the north-north-east slope of 2,369 foot high Hallival.

 


Other named guns in 1897 were: Mr. Hinton (8), Major Lynch (2), Mr. Hodge (2), Mr. Grant (1), Mr. Cole (2), Mr. McDonald (2), Mr. William Bullough (1), and Major Martyn (2).

1897 was the year construction of Kinloch Castle commenced. Taking three years to complete it was designed by Halifax, Yorkshire, architects, Leeming and Leeming, as a hunting lodge for bachelor George Bullough, 1870-1939, its dark wood panelling, smoking and snooker rooms made the interior reminiscent of a military gentlemans club.

1898 SEASON.

The 1898 and 1899 Seasons would have been increasingly disruptive. Kinloch Castle was well under construction, greenhouses built and soil brought in from Argyle to create the lawns and gardens. The only landing point was the 1840s stone pier, built during Lord Salisbury’s ownership of the island and useable only at high tide. The alternative was to beach boats at high tide and unload at low tide onto horse drawn carts, labour intensive and time consuming - plus, bear in mind, tides and short, often stormy winter days.

However, George Bullough had purchased his steam yacht Rhouma in late 1895 and the 857 ton vessel could easily accommodate the Laird and his guests until completion of Kinloch Castle in 1900, its tender ferrying to the shore as required.

1898 commenced on 23 August and ended 1 November with thirty-two stags recorded shot, five to the gun of George Bullough. The “Observations” column records Captain Homfray shooting a twelve point, seventeen stone “Royal” stag at Parkival on 1 September and  two instances of a stag being “shot right and left”, (i.e. referring to both barrels), the first by Major Lynch at Harris, the second by George Bullough in Guirdil Glen.


1899 SEASON.

George Bullough, Master Ian Bullough, Master Francis Cadogan and Mr. Millward were the four guns out on 23 August, the first day of the 1899 Season during which six stags were shot, the first recorded, an eight pointer by George Bullough the clean weight 16 stone 3-lb. (227-lbs.) with a .303 rifle, his season total nine. Master Cadogan (6), most likely a school friend of Ian Bullough (6), was Francis Charles Cadogan, fourteen year old son of Charles George Henry Cadogan, Captain in the Grenadier Guards. Master Cadogan rose to be a Commander in the Royal Navy.

                                                                                                                                                1999 continues ... ...

Thirty-eight deer over seventeen days were shot in 1899, nine by George Bullough. Other guns that season were: Master Ian Bullough (7), Master Francis Cadogan (6),  Mr. Cole (2), Major Lynch (6), Mr. Hodge (2), Captain Homfray, (2) Mr. Millward* (2), Mr. William Bullough (1), and a Mr. Costeker (1)” - possibly twenty-one year old John Henry Dives Costeker, later  major in the Royal Warwickshire Regiment, winner of the D.S.O., (Distinguished Service Order), served in the Boer War as an Adjutant Mounted Artillery, killed during the Gallipoli landing World War I on 25 April 1915. 

Stalkers: Malcolm Sinclair (18), John Ashworth (12), James McCaskill (8).

(* Millward as spelt in Record Book, Milward as spelt on mounted head below.)

Most of the shooting guests appear to have military, or business connections, or share a passion for field sport with George Bullough.


1900 SEASON

The War in South Africa, more popularly known as the Second Boer War commenced on 11 October 1899 and ended 31 May 1902.
The British thought it would be over within a few months but that proved far from
being the case as casualties mounted and medical care severely lacking. 
At the close British dead were over 22,000 the Boer dead almost 6,200.
Over 75,000 British returned home sick or wounded.
 George Bullough was knighted for his patriotic devotion in sending, equipping and staffing his yacht as a hospital ship during the early months of hostilities. 

The Isle of Rum Deer Forest Book records
a total of eighteen shooting days in the 1900 Season, 20 September to 16 November, with eleven named guns accounting for thirty-one stags, including the Austrian Stag shot on 8 October at Harris by Captain Christie with a .450 rifle, stalker James McCaskill.


Sir George returned 
from Cape Town with a number of recuperating officers on board Rhouma in October. He shot his only stag in 1900, an eight pointer,
 on 16 November near Caves Bay on the islands east coast.  
*
GEORGE BULLOUGH WAS KNIGHTED ON THE 21ST. DECEMBER 1901 BY KING EDWARD VII FOR PATRIOTIC DEVOTION IN PLACING HIS YACHT, 
RHOUMA AT THE DISPOSAL OF THE IMPERIAL AUTHORITIES AND FULLY EQUIPING AND STAFFING HER  AS  A  HOSPITAL  SHIP  TO BE MOORED IN 
TABLE BAY,  CAPETOWN, SOUTH AFRICA, DURING THE FIRST MONTHS 
OF THE BOER WAR, 1899-1902.

1901 to 1913 - Golden Years for Kinloch Castle
but not so Golden for stalking with an abundance throughout of bad heads and weedy stags.

Unidentified. Above doorway from main entrance to the Great Hall.

1 9 0 1    S E A S O N.

The dawn of the twentieth century also saw the completion of Kinloch Castle.
George Bullough filled his Highland Hunting Lodge with the many of the exotic items acquired during his three year world tour. 
*
The 1901 Sporting Season opened on 19 August with Mr. Hodge shooting an eight point stag at Ardneamh (Harris Glen) and concluded on 18 September when Sir George killed two stags; a six pointer at Papidale (Papadil) and a stag with 
deformed antlers in Harris Valley, his tally in 1901 being five of the forty-two deer killed over the twenty days recorded in the Game Book.
Mr. Coles second deer of the season, on the 18th was shot on one of the cliffs at Dibidil. The eighth of Mr. Hintons nine stags had  foreleg broken.


 Other guns included Master Ian Bullough (3), and Major Lynch (4). 
Captain Homfray shot four stags, regrettably wounding a nine pointer in Glen Guiridil on 21 August which was wounded - found dead next day 22nd.


1 9 0 2    S E A S O N.

Comprising twenty-four stalking days, the 1902 Season on Rum commenced 
on 13 August with Sir George accompanied by Captain Homfray shooting two stags - 
in Black Valley (6 pointer) and an eight pointer on Bloodstone Hill respectively. 
On 18 August stalker J. Macaskill shot an eight point stag which was found 
to be Blind in both eyes.


On 1 October Lieutenant McDonald shot an eight point stag, the Deer Forest Game Book Observation Column records: “Had fore leg broken 6 years ago.


Of the forty-three stags shot in 1902 Sir George killed ten. Other guns included: Major Lynch (7), Mr. Kirkwood (2), Master Ian Bullough (2), Mr. Cole (1), Colonel Sillim (1), Lieutenant Macdonald (2), Mr. Costeker (1), Major Deare (1), Mr. Hinton (2), and sitting Conservative Member of Parliament Sir Robert Trotter Herman- Hodge, Bt. (2) - he was raised to the baronetcy in 1902.
On the last day, Lady Bulloughs sixty-five year old father - Gerard Gustavus Ducarel 4th Count de la Pasture - shot a five pointer in Harris Valley. 

1903 SEASON.

The 1903 season commenced on 25 August and concluded 22 September.
It comprised thirteen recorded stalking days with twenty-seven stags being shot. Seven stags killed were described as of the Old breed.
Guns: Major Lynch (3 including one with Hind leg broken.), Count de la Pasture (1), Captain Homfray (3) ①, Mr. Graham Murray (2), Captain the Honourable Gerald Oakley Cadogan C.B.E. - from 1915 6th Earl of Cadogan, (2), Sir George Bullough (2), Colonel Sillom (3), Captain Bartholomew (1), Captain Millward (1), 
R. C. Leigh, Esq. (3), nineteen year old Hugh de la Pasture (2), Mr. Cole (2), 
Mr. Davenport (1), Captain Cole (1).

①   Samuel George Homfray, M.I.C.E., was born in Monmouthshire in 1855 the son of Captain S. G. Homfray and grandson of Samuel Homfray for over thirty years managing director of Tredegar Iron Works before selling the business in 1868. Educated at Cheltenham College aged seventeen he enrolled as a pupil at the Elswick Works of Sir W. G. Armstrong & Co., civil, industrial engineers. After serving in numerous positions, including installation of the swing-bridge over the River Tyne in 1876 and numerous dock facilities at home and abroad, he was appointed senior joint manager of the company’s engine works in 1902. He died following an operation in October 1908 aged fifty-three.

1904 SEASON.

The 1903 season commenced on 22 August and concluded 18 October.
Thirty stags were shot over seventeen stalking days, three of the Old breed.
On 7 September Lady Bullough shot an eight point stag in Black Corrie, the Observation column recording “1st Stag at 150 yards.” Other guns included: Sir George Bullough (2), Count de la Pasture (2), Colonel Sillom ((1), Captain Tristram (1), the Earl of Ilchester (1) being British Peer and Liberal politician Henry Fox-Strangways fifth Earl of Ilchester, Dr. Milsom Rees (3), Miss Montegon (1) Mr. Ian Bullough (1), Captain the Honourable Gerald Cadogan (1) and Mr. Francis Cadogan (1). 
The last two deer of the season were shot on 14 and 18 October in Black Corrie and at Kinloch respectively by Sir George Bullough (Old Breed) and a Three Antlered stag” stalker Malcom Sinclair. 

1905 SEASON.

The twelve day season in which twenty deer were shot commenced on 23 August with Major Deare shooting a seven point stag in Harris Glean and concluded 25 September when Sir George Bullough shot a five point Bad Head weighing 13st. 8-lbs. at Aedneamh, stalker James McAskill.

On Day 2, 28 August, Major Bayly and Mr. Sandford are recorded as shooting a ten and eight point stag respectively with a direct shot using a .303 gun. Captain Homfray shot his second stag on 4 September at Coire nan Grunnd, Bad Head”.


Other guns: Colonel Sillom (1), Count de la Pasture (1), Mr. Ian Bullough (2) , Master John Peacocke  
First Shot” (1), Mr. J. Cadogan (1) Major Macdonald (1) and  Sir George Bullough, on 25 September, last of three, Bad Head.

1906 SEASON

Only one gun is recorded in the 1906 Season, 6 September, Dr. Bertrand Dawson shot an eight point stag near Am Màm lochs, stalker Malcolm Sinclair.

Dr. Bertrand Dawson, F.R.C.P., K.C.V.O., K.C.B., P.C., was born in 1864, graduating from the Royal London Hospital in 1893 as a Doctor of Medicine. In 1907 he was appointed physician-extraordinary to King Edward VII. Following Edward’s death in 1910 he was promoted physician in ordinary to King George V, a position he held until 1936. In World War I he served in the Royal Army Medical Corps with the rank of colonel on the Western Front in France, rising to the rank of Major-General. In 1920 Dr. Dawson was elevated to the House of Lords as 1st Viscount Dawson of Penn. From 1928 to 1930 and 1931 to 1937, he held the position of president of the Royal Society of Medicine and Royal College of Physicians respectively. At about 11 o’clock on the night of 20 January 1936, with King George V dying, seventy-one year old Dr. Dawson “decided to determine (his) end and injected morphia gr. ¾ and shortly afterwards cocaine gr. 1 into the distended jugular vein … … in order to prevent further strain on the family and preserve the King’s dignity.”*  

Later that year in the House of Lords, Dr. Dawson expressed his opposition to the proposed move to legalise euthanasia by stating it, “belongs to the wisdom and conscience of the medical profession and not to the realm of law.

Dr. Dawson died in March 1945.                                            

                 * Dr. Dawson’s notes are held in the Windsor Castle Archives.   Wikipedia


 1907 SEASON. 


The eleven day 1907 season resulted in thirteen stags killed, five of which are recorded Bad Head”.
It opened on 16 August and concluded on 21 September.

The successful guns were: Captain Fenwick (1), Mr. Reed (1), Colonel Sillom (1) recorded as a twelve pointer at Harris on 21 August, but would seem not to have met the criteria of a True Royal, Mr. Roberts (1), Mr. Digby (3), Mr. Clark (1), Captain Count de la Pasture (2), Major Farquhar (1) and Captain the Honourable Ronald Graham Murray (2), b. 1875 d. 1934, predeceased his father, former Secretary of State for Scotland, Andrew Graham Murray, 1st Viscount Dunedin.

  ❷  Captain Count de la Pasture – twenty-one year old Gérard Hugh Ducarel, half-brother to Lady Bullough, became  5th Marquis de la Pasture upon death of the  4th Marquis 28 January 1916.


1908 SEASON.

Fifteen stalking days between 17 August and 3 October in which twenty-five stags, average clean weight 14½ stone (203-lbs.), were shot by thirteen guns. Weight of heaviest stag 18 stone ( 252-lbs.) shot by Colonel Leigh on 19 August.

Keepers killed a Lame Stag” on 1 October at Waterfall” in Kilmory Glen. Colonel Sillom shot a stag with a broken leg on 19 August near Hallival and an eleven point stag at Papadale on 28 August. 

Other guns in 1908: Major Farquhar (4), Captain Farquhar (1), Mr. Beech (1), Mr. Leigh (1), Baron von Harnier (1),  Major McDonald (1), Mr. McKenzie (1), Captain Lumb (2), Captain Fenwick (1), Mr. Hinton, (3), Mr. Cholmondely (5), Sir George Bullough (1).

Five stags were described as Bad Head”.

1909 SEASON.

Sir George Bulloughs deer management policy was to cull animals that were weedy, infirm, injured or had bad heads”. To improve the herd he imported stags from England, some it would appear did not always live up to expectations. 1909 stands out as a season much emphasis was placed on removing inferior animals, including seven imported stags, which, originating from southern England, could not thrive in the harsher conditions on Rum.

Commencing on 18 August the season comprised seventeen successful stalking days in which thirty-three deer were shot, of which six were “Imported stags going back in head and body. Average clean weight 14½ stone (203-lbs.).

Captain de la Pasture, (Charles Edouard Ducarel), Scots Guards, half-brother to Lady Bullough, served in the Boer War was killed at Ypres on 19 October 1914.

Displayed on pillar by the Orchestrion just off the Great Hall, this 8 point stag is not recorded in the Deer Forest Game Book. The name Shepherd does not appear in previous or subsequent stalking seasons.

1 9 1 0    S E A S O N.

    A Season devoted to removing  bad heads and  weedy stags.

The Observation column reads: 

All marked as bad heads or specially picked as weedy stags or in poor condition. 

However, on 24 September, Sir George Bullough shot his sixth stag of the season, a thirteen pointer at Ardneamh (Àrd Neabh) after a three hour and ten minute stalk with Joseph Macaskill using a .303 rifle. With a clean weight of 19 stone 6-lbs. (272-lbs.), it is described as the “Finest head killed on Rhum” and displayed the middle of the best five heads shot  pre-World War I in the Great Hall at Kinloch Castle.

      Guns included: Captain de la Pasture, Major Macdonald, Major Farquhar and Mr. Hinton.


1 9 1 1    S E A S O N.

Commencing 28 August the season ran until 29 September. Over fourteen stalking days twenty-eight deer were killed. The Observation column reads: All stags which are marked as bad heads are specially picked as weedy stags or in poor condition.  

The guns being used are .303, .375 and .350 calibre.

Successful guest guns: 
Captain de Crespigny (1)*, Captain Fenwick (2), Mr. Cholmondely (1), Mr. Hinton(4), Captain Symons (2) Mr. Fry (1), Sir William D. Cunyngham (3) Captain Lumb, (2), Mr. Kirkwood, M.P. (1), Major Farquhar (5), Captain Lumb (2), and host Sir George Bullough (4).

* Twenty-nine year old Captain Claude de Crespigny was born in January 1882 the third son of Sir Claude Champion de Crespigny, D.S.O. As a young officer in the 1st Wiltshire Regiment he served in the the Boer War in South Africa. 

1 9 1 2    S E A S O N.  

A total of forty stags are recorded shot over this eighteen day Season which commenced on 31 August and ran to 1 October on which day Keepers shot eight specially picked weedy stags.  A further fourteen stags were shot on various days by Sir George or his guests all being described as being in poor condition”, a bad head and in one case, lame in very poor condition. 
On 25 September Sir George Bullough shot a fifteen point stag in very poor condition which is displayed in the Great Hall as one of the five best heads shot prior to World War I.
Sir George Bullough, Dibidil, Stalker Donald McGillivray. Clean weight: 16 stone (224-lbs.)

1912 Sept. 25    Sir George Bullough    Dibidil    Don. McGillivray    15 point    16st.    .303     
In poor condition.  


Named guns: Mr. Davenport (1), Mr. Hugh de la Pasture (1), Dr. Johnstone (2) Mr. Pole (1), Captain Miles (3),  Major Farquhar (4), Sir John Rees, M.P. (1)*, Mr. Hinton (3), Colonel Henry (5), Mr. Cholmondely (4), Sir George Bullough (3), Keepers (12).
* Sir John Rees, K.C.I.E., C.V.O., (1854-1922), in 1912 Unionist Member of Parliament for Nottingham East and former Colonial Administrator in British India.

Named Keepers: Donald McGillivray and Joseph Macaskill.

Return from a successful stalk.”  (Undated, no identification.)
Location: foreshore Loch Scresort. *  The Gun could be Sir William Bass.

In 1912 Sir George commenced a passion for horse racing. Initially steeple chasing, culminating in his horse, Ballymacad winning the War National in 1917. 
In 1922 his racing interest moved completely over to flat racing and breeding which continued until his death in July 1939. 

1 9 1 3    S E A S O N. 

Nine stalks from 27 August to 22 September. Named guns: Mr. Swan (2), Count de la Pasture (4), Captain Darrell (2), Sir George Bullough (1).

Named keepers: John MacAskill, H. Campbell and Donald McGillivray.

Three bad heads, one weedy stag” and one Hummel Stag, (a stag with no antlers), a condition attributed to poor feeding conditions, which also most likely accounted for the numerous bad heads and weedy stags culled in recent years.
 
Rum was grossly overstocked with red deer 
relative to the available natural forage. 

Nine Stags average weight 12 stone 11-lbs.  *   Heaviest 15 stone 10-lbs. shot by Captain Darell.

Regrettably not all heads are identified. This one is displayed above the Great Hall 
doorway leading to main entrance cloakroom. (Missing left eye. July 2001)

This 8 point head is displayed by a Great Hall bay window. (March 2006)
This 10 point head is displayed on west wall of the Great Hall.
It is possible the unidentified heads date from John Bulloughs stalking years. 

1914 SEASON. 
World War I broke out on 28 July 1914.
No stalking - all able bodied men fighting in the Great War.

1915 SEASON. 
Between 17 August and 12 October eleven deer were killed over eleven stalking days by Keepers, average weight 13 stone 10-lbs., heaviest 15 stone 10-lbs. 
7 September records keeper John Rae shot a stag with only one horn. Two further one horned stags were killed on 28 August and 10 September. 


1916 SEASON.
From 26 August to 20 October 1916 over seventeen stalking days seventeen deer, (average clean weight 14 stone 11-lbs.) were killed. Named guns: Sir George's Factor, Wallace Brebner (15), Commander Gordon (1) and Lieutenant Soady (1)*, both of  His Majesty's (480 gross registered ton) Yacht Sayonara”. Stalker John Rae.

* Lieutenant Clive Lindsay Soady (Temporary Lieutenant in Royal Naval Reserve), born 1881 in Hampshire, youngest son Major Thomas Soady, 66th Regiment. Died of wounds inflicted while driving a touring car  in The Ballyvourney Ambush, (Ireland), 25 February 1921 in Cork Military Hospital. 

1917 SEASON.
A twenty-one day season commencing 15 August and concluding 15 October in which twenty one stags - one with a Broken Horn” -  were shot. 
Only two Guns: factor Wallace Brebner (18) and stalker John Rae (3). 
Heaviest 17 stone 2-lbs.  (Brebner at Gorston) .
Average 14 stone 9-lbs.

1918 SEASON.
World War I ended at 11am. on the eleventh day of the eleventh month 1918.
The 1918 twenty-one day stalking season on Rum commenced on 16 August and finished on 8 October during which twenty-one stags were shot. 
Island factor, Wallace Brebner, (10), A. W. Wood (1), John Rae - also stalker - (8), 
Lieutenant Commander G. P. Vercker, R.N. (surname illegible) (2). 

Heaviest 18 stones 3-lbs. a 12 pointer shot by Brebner at Papidal.
Season average 14 stones 9-lbs.

Extract Record Book - 3 September to 8 October 1918.

1919 SEASON.

The first post war season commenced on 20 August and ended 18 October. 
Twenty-nine stags were shot over fifteen stalks, the first an eight pointer by Sir George Bullough at Black Corrie. Sir George's half-brother, Ian, now thirty-three year old Major Bullough, shot two stags. Other guns included Mr. Haukey (1), Mr. H. F. Lofts (2), Gerard Hubert 5th Marquis de la Pasture* (3).
On 12 September, accompanied by her husband, Lady Bullough killed her first stag, 
a five pointer weighing 15 stones 2-lbs. at Sandaneson, (Samhnan Insir), near Kilmory. On 15 September Lady Bullough shot two more stags, a five and nine pointer at 
Water Fall and Harris respectively.  
It was 1919 that stalking records include the name Macnaughton. Duncan Macnaughton was head stalker, he was also a bagpipe player, his duties included rousing the Castle occupants every morning at 8 o'clock by marching along the glazed colonnade. 

A shooting party on principal east entrance steps Kinloch Castle. Sir George Bullough extreme right, 
Lady Bullough extreme left.
UNDATED. Possibly Sir William Bass next to Sir George and Gerard Hubert 5th Marquis de la Pasture in front of Lady Bullough. The ladies, clearly suffering the attentions of the notorious Rum Midge, are, again possibly, the wives of Sir William Bass and the Marquis. Plus four stalkers/keepers.
_______________________________________________________

* Second and youngest son of Gerald Gustavus Ducarel, 4th Marquis and his second wife, Georgina Mary Lougham, Gerard Hubert, half-brother to Lady Bullough, inherited the title upon the death of his father on 28 January 1916, his elder brother, Charles Edward having been killed at Ypres, France, in 1914 aged thirty-five. Gerard Hubert was the same age as Ian Bullough they were the only successful guns recorded on the 25 and 30 August. 
(The 4th Marquises first wife, Leontine nee Standish, died two days after the birth of her daughter Monica, Lady Bullough in 1869.)

1920 SEASON.

Opening 25 August the season lasted sixteen days concluding 7 October. 
Twenty-two stags, average weight 14 stone 12-lbs. (208-lbs.). Heaviest  16 stone 11-lbs. shot by "Keepers" at Kilmory on 28 September. 
Guns: Sir George Bullough (5), Mr. Davenport (3), R. W. Brebner (3), Mrs. Brebner (3), Keepers  - Duncan Mcnaughton, John Rae (8).


1 9 2 1    S E A S O N.

A nine stalking day season from 22 August to 3 October. 
Sir George Bullough shot two stags, one at Kilmory Flats on day one, the second at Papidal the following day. Stalkers Rae and Macnaughton respectively. On 20 September Mrs. Brebner shot a ten pointer at Gorston. The remaining seven stags were shot by keepers. Average weight 15st. 2-lbs. Heaviest 17st. 3-lbs. 


1 9 2 2    S E A S O N.

The year Sir George's horse Golden Myth won the Ascot Gold Cup and Gold Vase as his interests moved from steeple chasing to flat racing. He also commissioned a house built in Newmarket adjacent to Park Lodge stables run by his trainer, Jack Jarvis.


Eighteen stags over fifteen days, 21 August to 9 October. 

Heaviest 20 stone (280-lbs.) shot at Parkavil by Sir George Bullough. 

Sir George also shot a stag with a broken hind leg, making his season total eight.

First of two recorded kills by Lady Bullough using .360 rifle.

Other guns: Mr. Davenport (1), Sir Arthur Rose (1)*, Mrs. Brebner (1), 
R. W. Brebner (1), Keepers/Stalkers John Rae, Duncan Macnaughton (4).

* Sir H. Arthur Rose, D.S.O., held the rank of Honourary Lieutenant-Colonel in the Indian Army in World War I. Born in 1867 he retired from the Indian Civil Service in 1918. He died on the Channel Island of Jersey in 1933. 


WHERE IS IT NOW?

WHO AUTHORISES THESE MOVES?  WHY?

*
1 9 2 3    S E A S O N.

The nineteen day 1923 Season commenced on 11 August and concluded on 8 October during which thirty-two stags were shot. The Deer Forest book records: Sir George Bullough (12), Lady Bullough (2), Captain Gregson Ellis (2), Major Gore Laugton (5), Mrs. Gore Laugton (6), Keepers (5) - Duncan Macnaughton and MacDonald.

On 18 September Sir George shot a Switch; also known as a “murder stag” due to its antlers ending in a sharp point, i.e. having no tines (branches), lethal to an opponent in trials of strength and the rutting season.

1 9 2 4    S E A S O N.

The 1924 twenty-four stalking day season commenced on 29 July and concluded on 
10 October. A total of fifty stags were shot, heaviest 19 stone 2-lbs. (268-lbs.) 
Guns: Sir George Bullough (10), Wallace Brebner (2), Mr. Devonport (5), 
Mr. Mulholland (5), Sir William Bass (11), Lady Rowena Paterson (2), Captain Harrison (2), Major Guest (5), Captain Paterson (3) and Captain Gregson Ellis (5).
The second deer shot, 23 August by Sir George is recorded as "in poor condition."
 On 30 August Sir William Bass shot a 14 stone 2-lb., thirteen point stag described as "Going back in head and body." 
On 6 September, Sir George, Sir William Bass and Major Guest shot five stags in what appears to be a competition.

The record shows on 18 September Captain Gregson Ellis shot the forty-first stag of the season, at Sandancasor, (10 points, 
clean weight 18st. 11-lbs ), the average to that date being 15stone 10½-lbs.

Of the remaining nine stags in 1924, six were Selected for the good of the forest, one was a Cripple stag, the last, shot by Brebner, Had broken foreleg.

The exception, an eight pointer weighing 17 stone 6-lbs. shot by Mr. Davenport on Bloodstone Hill on 22 September. 

 Sir William  Arthur Hamar Bass, second Baronet, (1879-1952), was a descendent of William Bass founder of the Bass Brewing Company. Like Sir George Bullough he was a member of the Jockey Club. A significant racehorse owner, in 1904 he purchased  the great filly Sceptre” (by Edward, Prince of Wales (later King Edward VII) Persimmon (by St. Simon), for £25,000, equivalent to almost £3.3 million in 2021. (CPI Inflation Calculator). Sir William was a regular guest at Kinloch Castle from 1924, so much so a bedroom is named after him. Sir George bred three flat racers out of Sceptre's daughter, appropriately named, Sceptre's Daughter (born 1915 by Lord Derby's Swynford), to his winning stallion Golden Myth                                                                                                                         (See my Blog: Flat Racers owned by Sir George and Lady Bullough.)

 ② Major Oscar Montague Guest, 1888-1958. His father was Sir Ivor Guest, 1st. Baron Wimborne of Canford Magna, son of John Josiah Guest, owner (at the time) of the world’s largest iron foundry. His mother was Lady Cornelia Spencer-Churchill, eldest daughter of Sir John Spencer-Churchill, 7th Duke of Marlborough. Educated at Trinity College, Cambridge, he was a Captain of Yeomanry before serving as a Major in the Royal Air Force in World War I during which he was wounded. He was elected a Coalition Liberal Member of Parliament from 1918 to 1922 and from 1935 Conservative M.P. for the London Borough of Camberwell. 

1 9 2 5    S E A S O N.

Commencing 18 August and concluding 13 October this twenty-three day season was devoted to killing thirty-seven old and weedy stags, including a 14 stone Switch in Kilmory Glen on 5 October by Mrs. Brebner, and, on day one, a lame stag by her husband, estate factor, Wallace Brebner.

Guns: Mr. Brebner (2), Sir William Bass (15) including 
one through the heart at 250 yards,  Captain Sir H. E. De Trafford (4) ① using a .256 calibre gun. 
Sir George Bullough (9), Marquis de la Pasture (4) Mrs. Brebner (1), Keepers (2). 
The three stalkers: MacLeod, Macdonald and Macnaughton.



 ①  Captain Sir Humphrey Edmund de Trafford, M.C. (1891- 1971) succeeded his father in 1929 as fourth baronet. He was a captain in the Coldstream Guards and served in World War I where he gained the Military Cross. A prominent racehorse owner, he married the Honourable Cynthia Cadogan, daughter of Viscount Chelsea, their eldest daughter, Ann de Trafford, (born 1918), married Derek Henry Parker-Bowles (born 1915). Derek and Ann Parker-Bowles son, Brigadier Andrew Henry Parker Bowles, O.B.E., (born 1939) is the former husband of Camilla, (née Shand), who married H.R.H. Prince Charles on 9 April 2005, becoming Duchess of Cornwall.
Known as the Duke and Duchess of Rothesay in Scotland, they visited Kinloch Castle fourteen months later and toured the building and grounds.

②  In 1925 Marquis de la Pasture was thirty-nine year old Gérard Hugh Ducarel, 5th Marquis de la Pasture, born 3 May 1886, half-brother to Lady Bullough, formerly Monica Lilly Ducarel. He inherited the title upon the death of their father the 4th Marquis, on 28 January 1916.


1 9 2 6    S E A S O N.

In a deer forest the principal aim is to improve the herd's health and condition  by culling stags which are weedy or in poor condition. This was particularly so in the 1911 Season on the island of Rum. More important was the day by day monitoring by keepers for any trapped or animal injured. In the latter's respect 15 July 1926 was no exception with the culling of a ten point, 
174-lb. Blind stag by head keeper Duncan Macnaughton in Kinloch Parks.

The 1926 Season began on 26 August and lasted forty-one days, finishing on 1 October. 
Eleven guns killed, (including the Keeper), killed forty-two stags, the heaviest, a nine pointer, weighing 250-lbs., shot at Harris by Major Honourable Caryl Annesley.
All guns: Keeper (1), Sir George Bullough (6), Sir William Bass (11), Captain Jenkinson (4), 
Lord Harcourt (2) Major Honourable Caryl Annesley (3), Honourable Mrs. Jenkinson (1), 
Lady Noreen Bass (3)Major Honourable Oscar Guest (6)
Honourable Anthony Lowther (4) and (almost) twenty-year old Miss Hermione Bullough (1). 

 ①  William Edward Harcourt, 2nd Viscount Harcourt, K.C.M.G., O.B.E., D.L., a direct descendent of William the Conqueror, was born in October 1908 the son of Lewis 1st Viscount Harcourt and Mary Ethel (nee Burns), daughter of American banker Walter Hayes Burns, her mother was sister to American  financier and banker, J. Pierpont Morgan. His grandfather was Sir William Harcourt, British Chancellor of the Exchequer 1892-1895. William Edward worked for the London based investment bank, Morgan, Grenfell & Co., from 1931 as managing director and later as chairman. From 1958 to 1977 he was chairman of the Legal and General Assurance Company, he died in 1979.

  The Honourable Caryl Arthur Annesley, (1883 – 1949), was the second son of Sir Caryl Arthur Annesley, K.C.V.O., C.B., J.P., 11th Viscount Valentia, Premier Baronet in Ireland and Comptroller of the Royal Household 1898 – 1905. He succeeded as 12th Viscount Valentia and 2nd Baron Annesley of Bletchington on the death of his father on 20 January 1927, his elder brother having been killed in action in 1914 and died unmarried on 6 October 1949.

  ③ Lady Wilmot Ida Noreen Bass (née Hastings) was the daughter of Francis Power Plantagenet Hastings, 14th Earl of Huntingdon. Born in 1880, she married Major Sir William Arthur Hamar Bass (b.1879 – d. 1952), on 9 June 1903,  Described as “one of the best English sportswomen of the time”, Lady Bass died in 1949.

 Major Honourable Oscar Montague Guest (1888 – 1958), was the son of Sir Ivor Guest, 1st Baron Wimborne of Canford Magna and his wife, Lady Cornelia Spencer-Churchill, daughter of the 7th Duke of Marlborough and aunt of Sir Winston Spencer Churchill. The Guest family were wealthy industrialists, their name synonymous today with the manufacturing company GKN, Guest, Keen and Nettlefold, Ltd., a leading British multinational automotive and aerospace business whose roots lie at the start of the Industrial Revolution.

  Honourable Anthony Edward Lowther, D.L., J.P.,  (1896 – 1949), English courtier and lieutenant in the 10th Royal Hussars, was the eldest son of Lancelot Edward Lowther, 6th Earl of Lonsdale (1867 -1953), and Gwendolene Sophia Alice Sheffield, daughter of 5th Baronet Sir Robert Sheffield. He married Muriel Farrar daughter of Sir George Farrar, 1st Baronet of Chicheley Hall, Buckinghamshire in 1922. 

1 9 2 7    S E A S O N.

A twenty-two day season - 27 August to 3 October. Number of deer shot thirty-nine, two of which were Switch stags (no antlers) and one recorded as being weighed with lobster net on.*    further six, not included in the thirty-nine, were culled as weedy stags under thirteen stone.

* Heaviest: 17 stone 8-lbs.     -     Average: 15 stone 2-lbs.

Number of guns, eleven: Lady Bass (1), Sir William Bass (8), Viscount Valentia (1)Mr. Michael Portman (5), Honourable Nigel Glyn (1), Viscount Harcourt (6), Countess of Sefton (3) Earl of Sefton (3), Honourable Oscar Guest (6)Colonel Duff (3), Sir George Bullough (2).

Stalkers: Macnaughton, Mac Rae, Mac Nab. 

① Viscount Valentia is the former Honourable Caryl Arthur Annesley, he became 12th Viscount Valentia and Premier Baronet in Ireland following the death of his father on 20 January 1927, his elder brother having been killed in action in 1914 and died unmarried on 6 October 1949.

  Honourable Nigel Glyn was the eldest surviving son of Frederick Glyn, 4th Baron Wolverton (1864-1932), a Conservative politician, partner in the London banking firm of Glyn, Mills & Co., (taken over by Royal Bank of Scotland in 1969), and lieutenant in the Imperial Yeomanry during the Boer War. Nigel Glyn became became 5th Baron Wolverton on 3 October 1932.

③  William Edward Harcourt, 2nd Viscount Harcourt, K.C.M.G., O.B.E., D.L., a direct descendent of William the Conqueror, was born in October 1908 the son of Lewis 1st Viscount Harcourt and Mary Ethel (née Burns), daughter of American banker Walter Hayes Burns, her mother was sister to American  financier and banker, J. Pierpont Morgan. His paternal grandfather was Sir William Harcourt, British Chancellor of the Exchequer 1892-1895. William Edward  was educated at Eton and Christ Church, Cambridge. In life he worked for the London based investment bank, Morgan, Grenfell & Co., from 1931 as managing director and later as chairman. From 1958 to 1977 he was chairman of the Legal and General Assurance Company; he died in 1989.

④  The Earl and Countess of Sefton were Osbert Cecil Molyneux (6th Earl) and his wife, Lady Helena Bridgeman, daughter of the 4th Earl of Beadford. Lord Osbert  was a lieutenant in the 2nd Life Guards and later captain in the Lancashire Hussars Imperial Yeomanry. He inherited the earldom in December 1901 following the tragic death of his older brother, who died aged thirty-four, following a riding accident. He took his seat in the House of Lords as a Liberal, was appointed Master of the Horse in 1905 and Privy Councilor in January 1906. Lord Osbert died in June 1930, Lady Helena in August 1947, they had no children.

  Major Honourable Oscar Montague Guest (1888-1958), was the son of Sir Ivor Guest, 1st Baron Wimborne of Canford Magna, (Dorset, England), and his wife, Lady Cornelia Spencer-Churchill, daughter of the 7th Duke of Marlborough and aunt of British statesman and Prime Minister, Sir Winston Spencer Churchill. In 1918 he was elected a Liberal Member of Parliament (M.P.) for Loughborough, standing down in 1922, but returned in 1935 as Conservative M.P. for the London constituency of Camberwell. In the 1945 Election he was defeated by the labour candidate, the campaigning being focused on Britain's postwar future." The Guest family were wealthy industrialists, their name synonymous today with the manufacturing company GKN, Guest, Keen and Nettlefold, Ltd., a leading British multinational automotive and aerospace business whose roots lie at the very start of the Industrial Revolution.

1 9 2 8    S E A S O N.

A season of thirty-three shooting days commencing 25 August and concluding

21 October in which fifty-six stags were killed of which three were “Switch” stags

and one had only “one antler”.

The weights of a further seven, described as lean and weedy, are not included. 

Heaviest: 18 stone 8-lbs. (260-lbs.)  Average: 15 stone 8-lbs. (218-lbs.) 

Thirteen Guns: Viscount Sudley (2), Honourable Peter Tufton (3), Mr. Portman (2), 

Viscount Harcourt (1), Sir George Bullough 14), Sir William Bass(7), Lady Bass (3), Honourable Oscar Guest(6), Viscount Valencia (7) , Mr. Rush (6), 

Mr. Marriott (2 - including one with only one antler shot 29 September), 

Wallace Brebner (Factor) (2), Duncan Macnaughton (1).

                                              Stalkers: Sinclair, Macnaughton, Dempster.


①  Viscount Sudley, Arthur Paul John James Charles Gore, was an Anglo-Irish peer, author and translator. He was born 31 July 1903, the first son of Lt.-Col. Arthur Jocelyn Charles Gore, 6th Earl of Arran and Maud Beauclerk, daughter of Baron Huyssen van Kattendyke of Zeeland, Holland. Educated at Winchester College and New College, Oxford,  he entered the Essex Regiment as a lieutenant and served as aide-de-camp to the Governor General of the Union of South Africa, Earl of Clarendon. On his fathers death on 19 December 1958 he became 7th Earl of Arran, but killed himself nine days later aged fifty-five.  

②   The Honourable Captain Peter Sackville Tufton, J.P., was born in 1906 the son of John Sackville Tufton, D.S.O.,  2nd Baron Hothfield, (1873-1952, 1st Lieutenant in the Life Guards), and Lady Irene Louisa Arundel Hastings, daughter of Francis Power Plantagenet Hastings, 14th Earl of Huntingdon. He gained the rank of Captain in the Queen Victoria Rifles, serving later in the King’s Royal Rifle Corps. In September 1944 he married Alicia Perreau, daughter of General Arthur Montagu Perreau. Peter Tufton inherited the title 3rd Baron Hothfield upon the death of his father on 21 December 1952, he himself dying on 1 March 1956 without issue.

③  William Edward Harcourt, 2nd Viscount Harcourt, K.C.M.G., O.B.E., D.L., a direct descendent of William the Conqueror, was born in October 1908 the son of Lewis 1st Viscount Harcourt and Mary Ethel (née Burns), daughter of American banker Walter Hayes Burns, her mother was sister to American  financier and banker, J. Pierpont Morgan. His paternal grandfather was Sir William Harcourt, British Chancellor of the Exchequer 1892-1895. William Edward  was educated at Eton and Christ Church, Cambridge. In life he worked for the London based investment bank, Morgan, Grenfell & Co., from 1931 as managing director and later as chairman. From 1958 to 1977 he was chairman of the Legal and General Assurance Company; he died in 1989.


  Major Honourable Oscar Montague Guest (1888-1958), was the son of Sir Ivor Guest, 1st Baron Wimborne of Canford Magna, (Dorset, England), and his wife, Lady Cornelia Spencer-Churchill, daughter of the 7th Duke of Marlborough and aunt of British statesman and Prime Minister, Sir Winston Spencer Churchill. In 1918 he was elected a Liberal Member of Parliament (M.P.) for Loughborough, standing down in 1922, but returned in 1935 as Conservative M.P. for the London constituency of Camberwell. In the 1945 Election he was defeated by the labour candidate, "the campaigning being focused on Britain's postwar future." The Guest family were wealthy industrialists, their name synonymous today with the manufacturing company GKN, Guest, Keen and Nettlefold, Ltd., a leading British multinational automotive and aerospace business whose roots lie at the very start of the Industrial Revolution.

⑤   Viscount Valentia was the former Honourable Caryl Arthur Annesley, he became12th Viscount Valentia of County Kerry, Premier Baronet in Ireland following the death of his father on 20 January 1927, his elder brother having been killed in action in 1914. Viscount Valentia died unmarried on 6 October 1949 the title Baron Annesley becoming extinct. Educated at Eton and the Royal Military Academy, Sandhurst, he joined the Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire Light infantry in 1903 later transferring to the Royal Dragoons. In 1909 he was appointed A.D.C. to Sir Arthur Lawley, Governor of Madras (India). He later served as A.D.C., private secretary and Comptroller to the Prince Arthur of Connaught when Governor-General of South Africa.

                                      1 9 2 9    S E A S O N. 

A twenty-one day season commencing 26 August and finishing 1 October during which thirty-nine stags were killed, the last five by Keepers.

Guns: Sir George Bullough (5 including two “lean and weedy stags”), Mr. Portman (5), Lady Jane Egerton (2), Sir William Bass (14 including one “lean and weedy stag”), Countess of Sefton (5), Miss Hermione Bullough (3), Keepers (5). 

Stalkers: MacKenzie, Dempster, Macnaughton. 

                                     Average clean weight: 16 stone. (224-lbs.)                                     

Weight of heaviest: 21 stone 6-lbs. (300-lbs.)  - Sir William Bass.

①  Lady Jane Mary Egerton was born in September 1909 daughter of John Egerton, 4th Earl of Ellesmere and Lady Violet Lambton, daughter of Frederick Lambton 4th Earl of Durham. Her maternal uncle was John Lambton, 5th Earl of Durham, who married secondly, (his first wife having died in August 1924), Sir George and Lady Bullough’s daughter, Hermione, on 4 March 1931. On 7 February 1934 Lady Jane married Richard Ladislas Scrope, a member of the Scrope family of 14th century Castle Bolton, Wensleydale (Yorkshire), built for Sir Richard Scrope, Lord Chancellor of England to King Richard II. Lady Jane died in 1978, her husband died in 1990. 

②   The Countess of Sefton was Lady Helena Diana Bridgeman, (1907-1967), daughter of British soldier and peer, George Cecil Orlando Bridgeman, J.P., D.L., 4th Earl of Bradford. Her husband was Osbert Cecil Molyneux (1871-1930) a lieutenant in the 2nd Life Guards and later captain in the Lancashire Hussars Imperial Yeomanry. He became 6th Earl in December 1901 following the tragic death of his older brother, who died aged thirty-four, following a riding accident. Lord Osbert died in June 1930, Lady Helena in August 1947, they had no children. 

                                       Heaviest stag killed in 1929 Season - Stalker MacKenzie.

1 9 3 0    S E A S O N. 

                    The Season commenced on 8 August and finished on 9 October. Over twenty-six stalking days six guns killed forty-eight stags. Heaviest 17st. 8-lbs. (246-lbs.) Average weight 14st. 3½lbs (199½-lbs.)

        Guns: Sir George Bullough (17), Sir William Bass (19 including a Switch ), Miss Bullough (3 including Old Sandy),  Mr. W. J Baird (5 including lame stag) , Wallace Brebner (Factor - 2, one of which had a “Broken hind leg), Keepers (2 including a “Browless stag by Macnaughton).

Stalkers: Macnaughton, Stewart, MacKenzie.

① William James Baird, Master of the Cottesmore Hunt for ten years from 1921.


1 9 3 1    S E A S O N.

Clearly the economic situation was having an effect with Sir George's long-time friend, Sir William Bass, being the only (successful) guest gun.
A relatively short season of seventeen days, commencing 2 September and finishing 29 September in which the four guns shot twenty-six stags.
Guns: Sir George Bullough (12), Sir William Bass (8), Macnaughton - stalker (5), MacKenzie - stalker (1  -  Switch stag).
Heaviest: 16 stone 10-lbs. (234-lbs.)    *    Average: 14 stone 6-lbs. (202-lbs.)


1 9 3 2    S E A S O N.

A thirty stalking day season running from 23 August until 6 October in which fifty-six stags were shot plus one, on 22 August was found dead in Guirdil Glen but weighed at 14 stone 5-lbs.
Guns: Sir George Bullough (16 two of which described as being “In very poor condition), 
Mr. Portman (10), Sir William Bass (14), Mr. Baird (8), Mrs. Daniell (2), 
Countess of Durham (formerly Miss Hermione Bullough) (2), 
Macnaughton  - stalker (2), MacKenzie (stalker) (2).
Heaviest: 17st. 12-lbs.    *    Average: 14st. 12-lbs. 

① William James Baird, Master of the Cottesmore Hunt for ten years from 1921.

1 9 3 3    S E A S O N.

The  1933 Season, which comprised twenty-five stalking days, opened on 29 August and closed on 
4 October, in which fifty-eight deer are recorded killed by the Guns with "15 other stags killed but not weighed and not entered."
Guns: Sir George Bullough (18), Colonel Scott Duff (7), Captain Gregson Ellis (6), Mr. Baird (7), Sir William Bass (19), Lieutenant Commander Jones (1). 

Heaviest: 17st. 2-lbs.    *    Average: 14st. 4-lbs. 

Stalkers: Duncan Macnaughton, George Macnaughton, Donald MacKenzie.


Colonel Arthur Abercromby Scott-Duff was born in April 1874, son of the Right Honourable Sir Robert William Duff, a former Governor of New South Wales, and Louisa, 
née Scott, daughter of Scottish Liberal politician Sir William Scott, M.P., F.R.S.E., and former lieutenant in the Life Guards. Colonel Scott-Duff was ADC to the Governor of Singapore 1898-1899, served with the Gordon Highlanders in France in 1914. In December of 1914 he was appointed ADC to the Duke of Connaught, Governor-General of Canada. He married Stella Cecile Evelyn Maude, daughter of Lieutenant-General Sir Frederick Stanley Maude (son of General Sir Frederick Francis Maude, V.C.), in November 1928. He died in 1951. 

1 9 3 4    S E A S O N.   

This twenty-seven stalking day season ran from 1 September to 10 October in which one hundred deer are recorded in the Game Book with a further thirteen lean and weedy stags killed but not weighed. Heaviest stag: 18st. 8-lbs., an eleven pointer shot by Sir William Bass on 6 September on Trollaval, stalker George Macnaughton. 
Sir George Bullough shot the 100th  recorded stag of the season on the last day, 10 October, a nine pointer weighing 15st. 4-lbs. Stalker Duncan Macnaughton. 

Guns: Sir George Bullough (33), Hermione Countess of Durham (2 on the opening day - the second being her first Royal stag), Sir William Bass (17), Colonel Scott-Duff (15), Honourable Della North (2), Mr. Baird (6), Mr. Portman (14 - one of which was a Switch), Lord Glanusk (11).


In recognition of shooting one hundred stags in 1934 Sir George presented Head Stalker Duncan Macnaughton with a fine stalkers telescope.

①  The Honourable Dorothy (Della) North, born 1915, was the daughter of Lieutenant Dudley William John North, M.C., Reserve Regiment of Cavalry 1914-1917.  In 1941 she was granted the rank of a Baron’s daughter following the death of John Dudley North, 13th Lord North, who died aged twenty-four in action in H.M.S. Neptune sunk in the Mediterranean by an enemy mine on 19 December 1941.

②  Wilfred Russell Bailey, 3rd Baron Glanusk, succeeded to the title in 1928 on the death of his father. He rose to be a Colonel in the Grenadier Guards and served as Lord Lieutenant of Brecknockshire for twenty years, from 1928-1948, the year of his death. He left no male heir, the title passing to his first cousin, David Russell Bailey. His eldest grand-daughter, Tiggy Pettifer (née Legge-Bourke), was nanny the Prince William and Prince Harry, sons of Prince Charles and the late Princess Diana.


1 9 3 5    S E A S O N. 

Opening on 3 September, the twenty-eight stalking day season ended on 9 October.
Sixty-five deer were killed with an average clean weight of 14st. 2½-lbs. The heaviest, shot by Colonel Scott Duff at Harris on 21 September, stalker Donald MacKenzie.


Guns:
 Sir George Bullough (12), Sir William Bass (16), Captain Gregson Ellis (7)Mr. Baird (8),  A. Hall Watt, Esq. (4),   Captain the Honourable Claude Lambton (9), Colonel Scott Duff (9).
Stalkers: George Macnaughton, Duncan Macnaughton, Donald MacKenzie.

      As a thirty-seven year old captain, Philip George Saxon Gregson-Ellis shot his first deer on Rum on 3 September 1935. Born in Edinburgh, Scotland in August 1898 he saw active service in both World Wars, commanding the 5th Infantry Division during the 1944 Italian Campaign. Educated at Eton and the Royal Military College, Sandhurst, he was commissioned second lieutenant into the Grenadier Guards at the age of nineteen. Between the wars he attended the British army’s staff college at Camberley, Surrey, where he was appointed an instructor in 1937. In the Second World War he served as a General Staff Officer with the British Expeditionary Force in France, rising to Commanding Officer of the 2nd Battalion Grenadier Guards in 1940. His last recorded visit to Rum, as Lieutenant-Colonel Gregson-Ellis, was on 15 September 1938. In 1947, with the rank of Major General, he was appointed 189th Deputy Constable of Dover Castle, a position in which he deputised for the Lord Warden and Constable. He died in October 1956.

Like Lady Bullough, Gregson-Ellis was a gifted pianist; an unsubstantiated story says that Lady Bullough made a gift of one of the two Steinway pianos that used to stand back to back in the Great Hall to Major-General Gregson-Ellis upon his move into Dover Castle. 


1 9 3 6    S E A S O N.

Let us begin by reminding ourselves of a few of the major events in Great Britain during 1936, three years before the outbreak of World War II. 


King George V died in January, his eldest son became King Edward VIII; eleven months later he abdicated, his brother becoming King George VI. November also saw London’s Crystal Palace destroyed by fire and the start of BBC public television broadcasts.

In May, the maiden voyage of R.M.S. Queen Mary.

On the world stage, Jesse Owens won four Gold Medals at the Berlin Olympic Games, American President Theodore Roosevelt was re-elected, and on 7 September, in Tasmania, the last known Thylacine (Tasmanian Tiger) died.


Meanwhile on Rum, the 1936 Season started on Monday 24 August and concluded on Saturday 
3 October. Thirty-three stalking days during which twelve named guns shot eighty-two recorded stags, including 17 considered “weedy” but not in the weighing.
Heaviest: 20st. (280-lbs.)   *   Average: 15st. 10-lbs. 


Guns: Hermione, Countess of Durham (1), Sir George Bullough (24),  Mr. Hall Watt (5)
Captain Claude Lambton, (9 - including one lame stag)④ , Miss Lambton (1), 
R. Scrope, Esq. (4)Lord Hugh Percy (3), Mr. Williamson (4),  Sir William Bass (12), 
W. J. Anstruther Gray, M.P., ① (4 - including one very lean stag), Colonel Scott Duff (14), 
Keeper  - George Macnaughton (1). 

①   William John St. Clair Anstruther-Gray was born in 1905 only son of Colonel William Anstruther-Gray. Educated at Eton and Christ College, Oxford, in 1934 he married Monica Helen Lambton, only child of Geoffrey Lambton, second son of the 4th Earl of Durham thereby being sister-in-law to John Frederick Lambton, 5th Earl of Durham husband of Hermione, only child of Sir George and Lady Bullough. Anstruther-Gray served as a lieutenant in the Coldstream Guards in North Africa, France, Germany and China with the Shanghai Defence Force. A Unionist Member of Parliament for North Lanarkshire, he was created a baronet in 1956.

②   Alvery Digby Hall-Watt (1901-1961), owner of Bishop Burton Hall and estate, was brother of Richard Watt who was killed in World War I. They were sons of Richard Hall-Watt born 1865 and killed in a motoring accident in 1908. The estate and hall was bought from the Gee family in 1783 by Richard Watt (1751-1798) who rose from stable boy, via the merchant navy, to owning a sugar plantation in the West Indies producing rum and sugar. Alvery Digby Hall-Watt sold the estate in 1930, today it is Bishop Burton Agricultural College.

   Richard Ladislass Scrope was born in Ripon, North Yorkshire, on 22 August 1901, the son of Henry Aloysius Scrope and Maria-Mercedes Josepha Joanna Antoinetta (née De Laski). He married Lady Jane Mary Egerton, daughter of the 4th Duke of Ellesmere and Lady Violet Lambton  on 7 February 1934, her maternal grandfather being Frederick Lambton, 4th Earl of Durham, father of John Frederick Lambton, 5th Earl of Durham and husband of Hermione, daughter of Sir George and Lady Bullough.

④   Captain the Honourable Claude Lambton, D.S.O.,  born in 1888, was the younger brother of John Frederick Lambton - from 31 January 1929 5th Earl of Durham, and consequently brother-in-law of Hermione Bullough, daughter and only child of Sir George and Lady Bullough.

⑤   Lord Hugh Algernon Percy was born on 6 April 1914, son of Alan Percy, 8th Duke of Northumberland and Lady Helen Gordon-Lennox, daughter of the 7th Duke of Richmond. He was commissioned into Northumberland Hussars and in 1940 transferred to the Royal Artillery as a lieutenant.  In 1946 he married Lady Elizabeth Diana Montagu Douglas Scot, daughter of the 8th Duke of Buccleuch. After the war, (1947), he moved back to the Northumberland Hussars as a captain, and in 1956 was appointed Lord Lieutenant of Northumberland a post he held until four years before his death in 1988. Lord Percy succeeded the dukedom as 10th Duke in 1940 after his elder brother, Henry, the 9th Duke was killed during the retreat to Dunkirk in World War II. 

65 Stags over 15st 10-lbs.  and 
 “17 other lean weedy stags were killed but not weighed.
Total 82 Stags.   Weight of heaviest Stage 20st.

1 9 3 7    S E A S O N.

In Great Britain there was a change of British Prime Minister in May 1937 with Neville Chamberlain succeeding Stanley Baldwin. May also saw the German airship Hindenburg bust into flames at her mooring at Lakehurst, New Jersey, U.S.A. Motorists benefited then and today as safety glass in vehicle windscreens became mandatory. In June, the Duke of Windsor, formerly King Edward VIII, married American Wallace Simpson at the Château de Candé in central France. In July there was an assassination attempt on the new king, King George VI, in Belfast. On 21 December Walt Disney's full-length animated feature film Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs was premiered.

*

On Rum the annual Sporting Seasons started as usual. The first of nineteen stalking days set out on Saturday 4 September and finished on Friday 1 October. In total 52 stags were killed of which ten were considered “weedy” and not included in the weighing.

Heaviest: 18st. 10-lbs.     *     Average: 14st. 2-lbs.

Guns: Sir George Bullough (14), Colonel Scot Duff (6), Sir William Bass (8), Lord Brackley (6),   Lieutenant-Colonel Gregson Ellis (12 - including a Switch), Captain the Honourable Claud Lambton (6 - including a Switch)②.

①  John Sutherland, Viscount Brackley, (1915-2000), was the son of John Francis Granville Scrope, 4th Earl of Ellesmere and Lady Violet Lambton, daughter of the 4th Earl of Durham. He was educated at Eton and Trinity College, Cambridge. He married Lady Diana Evelyn Percy daughter of Alan Percy 8th Duke of Northumberland. He gained the rank of Captain in the Royal Armoured Corps and fought in World War II during which he was captured becoming a POW (Prisoner of War). He succeeded to numerous titles, the highest ranking being 6th Duke of Sutherland on 24 August 1944.

  Captain the Honourable Claud Lambton, D.S.O.,  born 3 December 1888, was the younger brother of John Frederick Lambton; their father was Frederick Lambton, 4th Earl of Durham who died on  31 January 1929, John Frederick succeeding as 5th Earl of Durham. In March 1931 Hermione Bullough, daughter and only child of Sir George and Lady Bullough married the 5th Earl, consequently Captain Lambton became Hermione’s brother-in-law.

③  As a thirty-seven year old army captain, Philip George Saxon Gregson-Ellis
  shot his first deer on Rum on 3 September 1935. Born in Edinburgh, Scotland in August 1898 he saw active service in both World Wars, commanding the 5th Infantry Division during the 1944 Italian Campaign. Educated at Eton and the Royal Military College, Sandhurst, he was commissioned second lieutenant into the Grenadier Guards at the age of nineteen. Between the wars he attended the British army’s staff college at Camberley, Surrey, where he was appointed an instructor in 1937. In the Second World War he served as a General Staff Officer with the British Expeditionary Force in France, rising to Commanding Officer o the 2nd Battalion Grenadier Guards in 1940. 
His last recorded stalk on Rum before the war, as  Lieutenant-Colonel Gregson-Ellis, was on 15 September 1938, when he shot an eleven point stag at Harris, his twelfth that season. 
In 1947, with the rank of Major General, he was appointed 189th Deputy Constable of 11th century Dover Castle, a position in which he deputised for the Lord Warden and Constable. 
As Major-General Gregson-Ellis he was the sole recorded gun on the Rum Deer Forest, 
apart from Keepers, in the 1945, 1947, 1948 and 1949 Seasons. 
He died in October 1956 aged fifty-eight.

Like Lady Bullough, Ellis-Gregson was a gifted pianist; an unsubstantiated story says that Lady Bullough made a gift of one of the two Steinway pianos that used to stand back to back in the Great Hall at Kinloch Castle to Major-General Gregson-Ellis upon his move into Dover Castle. 

As stalkers set out on 27 August who could have envisaged that just over twelve months later the world would be engulfed in another war? 

1 9 3 8     S E A S O N.

(Including some events from 1938.)

On 3 July the brand new streamlined Class A4 4468 steam locomotive Mallard reached a certified speed of 126 mph (203 km/h). Built in Doncaster for the London North Eastern Railway to a design by Sir Nigel Gressley Mallard was wind tunnel tested for hauling high speed, long distance passenger services.

On 15 September Prime Minister Neville Chamberlain met German Chancellor Adolf Hitler in Germany in an attempt to avoid confrontation over German expansionist policies. Fourteen days later Chamberlain and Hitler signed the Munich Agreement declaring all future disputes between Great Britain and Germany would be resolved by peaceful means. The following day Chamberlain arrived back in Britain with the signed resolution, later giving his famous Peace in our time speech.

On 27 September the largest ship in the world (at the time), RMS Queen Elizabeth, 83,673 gross registered tons, was launched at Clydebank. 16 December saw the commissioning into the Royal Navy of the 27,720 ton aircraft carrier HMS Ark Royal. Built by Cammell Laird, Birkenhead, Ark Royal had been launched in April the previous year.

*

The 1938 Stalking Season on Rum commenced on 27 August when Captain the Honourable Claud Lambton shot a six point 13st. 8-lb. stag in Glen Dhui. The twenty-two stalking days concluded on 11 October with 58 stags killed, (seven of which were not weighed) the heaviest being 17st. 10-lbs. shot by Sir William Bass at Ard Nev on 19 September. 
The last stag of the season killed by Sir George Bullough, and the last before his death on 26 July 1939 was a seven pointer on the North Side on 6 October. 

Guns: Captain The Honourable Claud Lambton ③ (6 of which one is recorded “lame stag and not weighed), Miss Lambton (1), Sir George Bullough (19 of which one had only one antler and, with two other stags was not weighed), Hermione Countess of Durham (2), Lord Brackley ① (5 of which one was not weighed), R. Scrope, Esq. (4) , Lord Ridley (4)④.
Sir William Bass (10 one of which was not weighed), Colonel Scott Duff (5 one of which  was not weighed), Keepers - unnamed (2 both recorded as Switch stags).

First seven successful stalks in 1938.
Last nine entries for 1938.

①  John Sutherland, Viscount Lord Brackley, was the son of the 4th Earl of Ellesmere and his wife the former Lady Violet Lambton, daughter of the 4th  Earl of Durham and  sister of the 5th Earl the husband of Hermione Bullough, daughter of Sir George and Lady Bullough. Viscount Brackley was born on 10 May 1915, educated at Eton and Trinity College, Cambridge, he married Lady Diana Evelyn Percy (born 1917) daughter of Alan Ian Percy 8th  Duke of Northumberland and Helen Magdalen Gordon-Lennox, daughter of the 7th  Duke of Richmond. Lord Brackley was styled Viscount until 1944 and from 1963 6th  Duke of Sutherland when he inherited the ducal title from a distant cousin. His wife died in 1978, John Sutherland died in September 2000.

  ②   Richard Ladislass Scrope was born in Ripon, North Yorkshire, on 22 August 1901, the son of Henry Aloysius Scrope and Maria-Mercedes Josepha Joanna Antoinetta (née De Laski). He married Lady Jane Mary Egerton, daughter of the 4th Duke of Ellesmere and Lady Violet Lambton, daughter of the 4th Earl of Durham, on 7 February 1934. Lady Violets brother, John Frederick Lambton, 5th Earl of Durham married Hermione, daughter of Sir George and Lady Bullough in 1931 seven years after the death of his first wife.

  Captain the Honourable Claud Lambton, D.S.O.,  born 3 December 1888, was the younger brother of John Frederick Lambton; their father was Frederick Lambton, 4th Earl of Durham who died on  31 January 1929, John Frederick succeeding as 5th Earl of Durham. In March 1931 Hermione Bullough, daughter and only child of Sir George and Lady Bullough married the 5th Earl, consequently Captain Lambton became Hermione’s brother-in-law.

④  Lord Ridley, Matthew White Ridley, 3rd  Viscount Ridley, C.B.E, was born in 1902 and inherited the title on the death of his father when he was thirteen years old. Educated at Eton and Balliol College, Oxford., he was a self taught engineer and racing car enthusiast, designing and building his own car. In 1931 he achieved speeds of 104.56 and 105.42 miles per hour respectively for the “flying mile” and “flying kilometre”. The same year he was badly injured in an accident at the Brooklands Race Track after reputedly reaching a speed of 112 m.p.h. His other titles included Baron Wensleydale and Baron Ridley. He served as an officer in the Northumberland Yeomanry and honorary colonel in the Tyne Electrical Engineers, in business he was chairman of Consett Iron Works and a board member of Lloyds Bank. Viscount Ridley married to Ursula Lutyens, (1904-1967), the couple having  two sons and one daughter, the eldest son, also Matthew White Ridley became 4th Viscount on the death of his father  in 1964.

1 9 3 9    S E A S O N.
(Including some news items for 1939.)  

The news that Britain was again at war with Germany was broken to the British  people by Prime Minister Neville Chamberlain in a radio broadcast at 11.15am. on 3 September 1939 following Germany's invasion of Poland two days earlier and failure to respond to Britain's ultimatum to immediately withdraw. Hostilities were to last five years.

 On Sunday 7 December 1941 Japan attacked the American Fleet at Pearl Harbour, Honolulu, Hawaii. The following day Japan announced its declaration of war on the United States and the British Empire. 
 *
Guest stalking on Rum ceased with the outbreak of war but herd welfare management continued with  gamekeepers checking the health and well-being of the deer and controlling numbers. 
 
Between 1 September and 4 October twenty-four stags were shot over all beats,
the heaviest, 19st. 4-lbs. at Harris. The average weight being 14st 12-lbs.
In addition thirty-five hinds are recorded shot, a total for 1939 being fifty-nine. 

 1 9 4 0     S E A S O N.

January saw two million 19 to 27 year olds called for military service, and the introduction of food rationing. In February a Heinkel German bomber became the first enemy plane to be shot down over Britain.

In March RMS Queen Elizabeth embarked on her maiden voyage to New York.

On 10 May Prime Minister Neville Chamberlain resigns. Winston Churchill became leader of a coalition government. 

26 May 300,000 British troops were evacuated from the beaches of Dunkirk to England. 

18 June Churchill declares, 

“ … the Battle of France is over. The Battle of Britain is about to begin … ” 


On 20 August Churchill paid tribute to the Royal Airforce fighter crews: 

“Never in the field of human conflict was so much owed by so many to so few.”


7 September, the Blitz, fifty-seven consecutive days of bombing of London begins.

14-15 November the centre of the city of Coventry was destroyed by 500 German bombers, followed in November by raids on Birmingham, Southampton, Bristol, Liverpool and, in December, Sheffield was heavily bombed with 660 killed and 30,000 left homeless.

Saturation bombing of London three days before 1 January 1941 saw the city engulfed in flames with the resulting destruction and terrible loss of life.



Between 16 August and 8 October eighty-two stags were shot over all beats, the heaviest being 16st. 8-lbs., the average weight 14st. 1-lb. 

In addition  one hundred and ten hinds were killed, a total of one hundred and ninety-two. 



1 9 4 1     S E A S O N.

On 10 January the United States Congress introduced the Lend-Lease Act, a system by which the United States would lend or lease war supplies to any nation deemed “vital to the defense of the United States.” It was passed by the U.S. House of Representatives on 8 February.

On 20 January Franklin D. Roosevelt was sworn in for a third term as President of the United States.

Soviet geologist, twenty-eight year old Tatyana Ustinova discovers the Valley of Geysers in Kamchatka , the second largest concentration of “pulsating” geysers in the world.

On May 9 the British Royal Navy captured the German submarine U-110. The latest Enigma cryptography machine found onboard led to Allied cryptographers breaking coded German messages.

June 22 saw Germany and her allies invade the Soviet Union in Operation Barbarossa.

In July the Empire of Japan called up one million men for military service.

On 17 October the US destroyer USS Kearmy is damaged by torpedoes killing eleven sailors, the first American casualties of World War II in which on that date America was still neutral.

7:55a.m. HST, 7 December 1941, the day on which Japan attacked the American fleet anchored at Pearl Harbour, Hawaii, bringing the United States into World War II.

Less than eight hours later Japanese forces invade Hong Kong which is defended by British and Canadian troops. The United Kingdom and Canada officially declare war on the Empire of Japan.

Two days later Japan declares war on the United States and Europe.

On 26 December Winston Churchill addresses a joint session of the United States Congress, the first British Prime minister ever to do so. 

+++   ***   +++   ***   +++

The season commenced on 30 August and concluded on 2 October.
Over ten stalking days twenty-six stags averaging 14st. (196-lbs.) were shot, 
the heaviest being 15st. 10-lbs. (220-lbs.)
A further twenty-one “very weedy stags were shot and “buried”.
In addition 57 hinds were culled.  

Guns: Stalkers (12), Mr. Callendar (3), Lieutenant R. Green, R.N. (3),

Warrant Officer Mr. G. B. Pratt (1), Sub-Lieutenant M. Cassidy (1),

Petty Officer Hiscock (1), Lieutenant Wilson (2),

Lieutenant Lees (1), Mr. Barclay (2).




1942, 1943, and 1944 SEASONS.

1942 

In January the first United States troops arrived in the United Kingdom.
In February Princess Elizabeth (from 1952 Queen Elizabeth II), registers for war service.
On 30 May the first Royal Air Force thousand bomber raid” bombed the German city of Cologne.
On 2 October, off Ireland's Donegal coast, while escorting the 81,000 ton R.M.S. Queen Mary, carrying thousands of American troops to the U.K. port of Liverpool, 
the British 4,260 ton cruiser H.M.S. Curçao, whilst zig zagging, 
crossed too close to the path of the liner and was sunk, 338 men drowned.
The milk ration was cut to 2½ pints per person per week on 25 October.
On 30 October British sailors boarded the sinking German submarine U-559 in the Mediterranean Sea and retrieved the Enigma cryptography machine and codebooks. 



1 9 4 3

This was the year of the famous “Dambusters Raid” which took place on 16-17 May when 617 Squadron of the Royal Air Force, using the specifically invented bouncing bomb, breached Germany’s Mōhne and Edersee dams in the Rhur Valley.

The Cairo Conference was held in Egypt on 22-26 November. U.K. Prime Minister Winston Churchill, U.S. President Franklin D. Roosevelt, and Generalissimo Chiang Kai-shek, Chairman of the National Government of the Republic of China, met to discuss options for the defeat of Japan in the Pacific War.

On 2 December, three homing pigeons, White Vision, Winkie and Tyke became the first recipients of the Dickin Medal, the animal equivalent to the Victoria Cross, Britain’s most prestigious award for valour in the presence of the enemy to members of the armed forces. On 11 October White Vision delivered her message from a Catalina flying boat forced to ditch due to bad weather in the sea off the coast of Scotland. With the ’plane’s radio out of action White Vision, a member of the National Pigeon Service, flew sixty miles against a strong headwind to her loft with the vital message. The subsequent search found the ’plane and all eleven members of the crew were saved after eighteen hours in the water.

Winkie was onboard a British Bristol Beaufort torpedo bomber, when as a result of enemy fire it crashed into the freezing waters of the North Sea on 23 February 1942. Winkie flew 120 miles to her loft safely delivering her message. A search successfully found and saved all the airmen.

Tyke, a male pigeon, reared in Egypt, was onboard an American bomber when it was shot down during the Mediterranean Campaign. Tyke was released with his message for help. After flying over one hundred miles in poor visibility he arrived at his loft, the message read and the crew’s lives saved.

1 9 4 4

The last German heavy bombing raid on London, known as Operation Steinbock, took place on 26 February. However air raids, mostly over southern England, continued until the end of May.
10 February saw the introduction of PAYE, (Pay As You Earn), an already deducted tax on  earnings using a sliding code based on a person's allowance relative to status: married, children, dependents etc.  
29 May - Heavy flooding occurred in parts of Yorkshire following violent thunderstorms.
6 June - D-Day - the Normandy Landings, when 155,000 Allied troops came ashore on the beaches 
of Normandy, France.
13 June - The first V-I flying bomb attack on London. By 12 August, the sixtieth day of V-I attacks, deaths attributable were over six thousand with 17,000 injured and one million buildings destroyed.
7 September - Return of the exiled Belgian Government following the liberation of Brussels. Belgium was declared free of German troops on 4 February 1945.
8 September - the first V-2 rocket attack on London was followed by attacks on the east-coast port city of Ipswich and inland town of Norwich, forty miles to the north.
9 October - Start of the nine day Moscow Conference between British Prime Minister Winston Churchill 
and Soviet Premier, Joseph Stalin.
12 November - Royal Air Force Lancaster bombers attack and sink the 42,900 ton German battleship, Tirpitz, sister ship of Bismarck, as she lay at anchor in TrØmso Fiord, Norway.
24 December - Fifty V-I flying bombs were launched from Heinkel He 111 bombers flying over the 
North Sea targeting the west-coast town of Manchester killing at least twenty-seven.

The continuing war meant the 1944 Olympic Games scheduled for London, the host city having been selected by ballot in 1939, were cancelled They were finally held in London in 1948.

1 9 4 5   

The last German V-I flying bomb attack on Britain took place on 29 March.
After 2,047 days of war, Tuesday 8 May, Victory in Europe, VE Day as it became known, marked the cessation of hostilities in Europe. On 9 May German forces in the Channel Islands, the only enemy occupied part of the British Isles, surrendered. 
Meanwhile, the war in the Pacific raged on for another ninety-eight days until Japan's surrender was announced on Tuesday 14 August, VJ Day.

A British Parliamentary General Election was held on 5 July1945. Prime Minister, Winston Churchill and his Conservative Party were beaten by Labour in a landslide victory. The new Prime Minister, Clement Attlee, who had led Labour since 1935, had a majority of 145 M.P.s.  

On Rum the season started on 3 August and concluded on 4 October. Over thirteen stalking days twenty specially picked stags were shot plus one hundred hinds. 
The heaviest stag weighed 15st. 7-lbs. clean weight, killed by Duncan Macnaughton on 
26 September on Rums North Side. The average clean weight was 13st. 7-lbs. 

The only guest gun, Major General Gregson-Ellis* shot ten stags, including a Switch; stalker, Duncan Macnaughton the other ten, also including a Switch.

 *  Born in Edinburgh, Scotland in August 1898, as a thirty-seven year old army Captain, Philip George Saxon Gregson-Ellis shot his first deer on Rum on 3 September 1935.  
He returned in 1945 and was a regular Gun every year for the next nine years.
He saw active service in both World Wars, commanding the 5th Infantry Division during the 1944 Italian Campaign. Educated at Eton and the Royal Military College, Sandhurst, he was commissioned second lieutenant into the Grenadier Guards at the age of nineteen. Between the wars he attended the British army’s staff college at Camberley, Surrey, where he was appointed an instructor in 1937. In the Second World War he served as a General Staff Officer with the British Expeditionary Force in France, rising to Commanding Officer of the 2nd Battalion Grenadier Guards in 1940. 
Captain Gregson-Ellis’s last recorded stalk on Rum before the war, as  Lieutenant-Colonel Gregson-Ellis, was on 15 September 1938, when he shot an eleven point stag at Harris, his twelfth that season. 
In 1947, with the rank of Major General, he was appointed 189th Deputy Constable of 11th century Dover Castle, a position in which he deputised for the Lord Warden and Constable. 
As Major-General Gregson-Ellis he was the sole recorded gun on the Rum Deer Forest, 
apart from Keepers, in the 1945, 1947, 1948 and 1949 Seasons. His remaining stalks being in 1952 and 1954. General Gregson-Ellis died on 20 October 1956 aged fifty-eight.

Like Lady Bullough, Ellis-Gregson was a gifted pianist; an unsubstantiated story says Lady Bullough made a gift of one of the two Steinway pianos that used to stand back to back in the Great Hall at Kinloch Castle to Major-General Gregson-Ellis upon his move into Dover Castle.

1 9 4 6

The Season commenced on 6 August and concluded on 2 October.
Over twenty-five stalking days fifty stags were shot, plus fifty hinds not recorded.
Heaviest stag 18st. 9-lbs.   *   Average weight 13st. 10-lbs.
Guns: George Macnaughton (15 including a Switch), Duncan Macnaughton (30), guest gun Colonel Horlick (5).

Lieutenant-Colonel James Nockells Horlick. O.B.E., M.C., (b. 1886-1972), second son of Sir James Horlick, was co-inventor with his brother, Ernest Burford Horlick, of the renowned Horlicks Malted Milk drink. Educated at Eton and Christ Church, Oxford, James was a first-class cricketer. He joined the Coldstream Guards in 1914 being mentioned in dispatches four times and receiving the Military Cross amongst other decorations. From 1923 to 1929 he served as Member of Parliament for Gloucester. In 1944 he purchased the island of Gigha which included Achamore House, off Scotland’s west coast.  He was an enthusiastic breeder of rhododendrons, a shrub which was also a favourite of Lady Bullough. In 1958 following the death of his elder brother he became Sir James Horlick, 4th Baronet. Sir James died in 1972, the title passing to his fifty year old son, John James Macdonald Horlick. Today the title is held by Sir James Cunliffe William Horlick, 6th Baronet. 

1 9 4 7 

   The Season commenced on 18 August and ended on 1 October. Over eighteen stalking days         twenty-four stags were shot, the heaviest weighing 17st. 6-lbs.  Average weight 13st. 8-lbs.                           In addition 37 hinds were killed but not recorded. Guns: Duncan Macnaughton (2 both Switch), George Macnaughton (2 of which one a Switch), General Gregson-Ellis (19). 

 
1 9 4 8

The sixteen stalking day season commenced on 7 September and concluded on 30 September, during which 26 stags were shot plus 30 hinds, the latter not recorded.
The heaviest stag weighed 17st. 2-lbs.  The average weight being 14st. 3½-lbs.
Guns: General Gregson-Ellis (18), Captain Stanton (4), George Macnaughton (2), 
Duncan Macnaughton (2).


1 9 4 9

The first of twenty-one stalking days set out on 23 August and concluded on 4 October. Thirty stags were shot plus twenty-five hinds which were not recorded. 
Guns: Mr. Roger de la Pasture (6), 
General Gregson-Ellis (12 including one Hummel and one Switch), 
The Duke of Northumberland (4),  Mr. Hall Watt (1), 
Captain the Honourable Claud Lambton (5 including one Switch), 
Duncan Macnaughton (1), George Macnaughton (1). 

Hugh Algernon Percy, 10th Duke of Northumberland, the son of Alan Percy, the 8th Duke, was born on 6 April 1914. He succeeded to the title upon the death of his elder brother, the 9th Duke, killed in World War I during the retreat from Dunkirk. Hugh Percy was commissioned into the Northumberland Hussars transferring as a lieutenant to the Royal Artillery. As Captain Percy he transferred back to the Northumberland Hussars in 1947. He married Lady Elizabeth Diana Montagu Douglas Scott, daughter of the 8thDuke of Buccleuch in 1946 and they had seven children. A keen huntsman he was Master of the Percy Foxhounds from 1940 until his death in 1988 when he was succeeded by his eldest son, Henry Alan Walter Rich Percy (born 1953) as 11th Duke of Northumberland.

1 9 5 0

Lady Bullough was eighty-one years old in 1950, a widow since the death of Sir George in July 1939, she lived at Warren Hill, Newmarket, over five hundred miles from Mallaig, the ferry port to the Small Isles off Scotlands west coast, which included her island of Rum.

1950 was a short stalking season of eleven days. It opened on 2 September and ended on 3 October, during which seven guns shot twenty stags plus a further twenty-six hinds.
Weight of heaviest stag 17st.  *  Average weight of all stags shot 14st. 3½-lbs.

Guns: George Macnaughton (5), Duncan Macnaughton (1), 
The Honourable M. E. Joicey   (4 of which one was a Hummel)
Mr. Lyell (3), The Right Honourable Viscount Ridley ② (4), The Duke of Northumberland (2), 
Major Anstruther Grey (1).

The last four days of the 1950 Season.

①  Michael Edward Joicey, D.S.O., 4th Baron Joicey, born in 1925 was the younger son of Lieutenant-Colonel Hugh Edward Joicey, the 3rd Baron and Lady Joan Katherine Lambton, youngest daughter of Frederick Lambton, 4th Earl of Durham and sister to John Frederick Lambton, 5th Earl, who married Hermione Bullough in 1931 following the death of his first wife in 1924 at the age of twenty-three. Michael Edward inherited the title upon the death of his father in 1966, his elder brother, David Hugh Joicey, a lieutenant in the Coldstream Guards having died from wounds received in action in 1943 at the age of twenty-one. The Joicey family were directors, through mergers, in the former Lambton Collieries, which merged with Hetton Collieries in 1911 and Joicey Collieries in 1924, to become Lambton, Hetton & Joicey Collieries, a privately owned coal mining company based in County Durham, England. The family seat is Etal Manor on the Ford and Etal Castle estate in Northumberland.

②  The Right Honourable Viscount Ridley was Matthew White Ridley, born 1902. He succeeded as 3rd Viscount Ridley at the age of fourteen his father having passed away following an operation. His mother  was Rosamond Cornelia Gwladys Guest, daughter of  industrial magnate Ivor Guest, 1st Baron Wimborne. Guest was one of the three founding figures in the 18th century iron and steel revolution, John Guest, Arthur Keen and Joseph Henry Nettlefold, today the British automotive and aerospace multinational GKN, Guest, Keen & Nettlefolds, Ltd., since 2018 part of Melrose Industries. Matthew was educated at Eton College, Berkshire and Balliol College, Cambridge.  He was a self-taught engineer building his own racing car and setting some early speed records before being badly injured in an accident. He served as an officer in the Northumberland Yeomanry and as an active member of the Territorial Army; from 1928 he was a member of Northumberland City Council until his death in 1964. In 1924 Ridley married Ursula Lutyens, daughter of English architect Sir Edwin Landseer Lutyens, they had two sons and one daughter.

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The 1951 Season was restricted to Captain J. M. Pearson and his Party. Over nineteen stalking days between 30 August and 10 September Captain Pearson and his fellow nine guns shot thirty stags, heaviest 18st. 2-lbs. Average 13st. 10-lbs., plus twenty-five hinds.
Guns: Captain J. M. Pearson (11), Mrs. Pearson (9), Colonel J. D. Frost (1), 
The Honourable G. Runciman (1)  , Mrs. Long (2), Admiral MacLaughlan  (2), 
Captain Du-Boulay  (1), Colonel I. J. Black (1), Captain W. Gregory, R.N. (1), 
A. R. Paterson (1).


 
  At the time of this visit to Rum, Walter Garrison Runciman was almost seventeen years old. Son of Leslie Runciman, 2nd Viscount Runciman of Doxford by his second wife, Katherine Schuyler Garrison, he was born in November 1934 and educated at Eton College, Berkshire, where he was an Oppidan Scholar, a pupil who distinguished himself academically, before attending Trinity College, Cambridge, where he joined the faculty as historical sociologist becoming a junior research fellow. In April 1963 he married twenty-seven year old Ruth Hellman, they had three children. In 1971 Runciman was appointed senior research fellow, later holding  honourary degrees from King’s College, Cambridge and the Universities of York, Edinburgh and Oxford, amongst other honourary posts. He became 3rd Viscount Runciman of Doxford upon the death of his father in September 1989, speaking many times in the House of Lords as a hereditary peer. From 1991 he chaired the British Government’s Royal Commission on Criminal Justice, and until his retirement in 1998, on the Securities and Investment Board of the Bank of England. 
After a distinguished career, which also included authorship of a number of major publications, Viscount Runciman died on 10 December 2020, aged eighty-six.

②  Admiral MacLaughlan, R.N., D.S.O., C.B., was Patrick Vivian MacLaughlan, born 
7 April 1901. On 30 August 1945, as Captain MacLaughlan of H.M.S. Swiftsure, an 8,800 ton light cruiser and flagship of the British Pacific Cruiser Squadron, he entered Victoria Harbour, Hong Kong to oversee and receive the surrender of Japanese forces. He was appointed Rear Admiral on 8 July 1949.

   Captain Ernest George Houssemayne Du-Boulay was born on 23 December 1882, his younger brother, Charles John Houssemayne Du-Boulay on 20 April 1894. Their father was retired Royal Engineers colonel, Woodforde George Houssemayne Du-Boulay. Both sons served in the Royal Navy, Charles John being promoted Commander in 1934, whilst Ernest George is referred to as Captain Du-Boulay, and almost certainly the Captain Du-Boulay recorded as shooting a seven point stag on Kilmory Hill on 3 September 1951.

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On 6 February 1952 King George VI died to be succeeded by his eldest daughter 
and current queen, twenty-five year old Elizabeth Alexandra Mary Windsor, 
Queen Elizabeth II.
*

There were no guest guns in 1952. The nine stalking days commenced on 16 September and ended on 7 October with nine stags shot, the heaviest 18st., the average 14st. 2-lbs.
Keepers: George Macnaughton (4 including one Hummel)  Duncan Macnaughton (5).


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The Season commenced on 21 August and concluded on 6 October. Over twenty-four stalking days 35 stags were shot and thirty hinds, the latter not included in the weighing.
The heaviest stag weighed 16st. Average of all stags 14st. 2-lbs. 
Guns: George Macnaughton (9), Mater Robin Grey (3), General Gregson Ellis (5), Mr. Brauch (1), Major Grey (1), Commander De La Pasture (2), Lieutenant P. E. E. Pain (2), 
Duncan Macnaughton (5), Major Anstruther Grey (3), Mrs. Anstruther Grey (2), 
Hermione, Countess of Durham (2).

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A sixteen stalking day season running from 13 August to 5 October during which nineteen stags, (one very lean stag - not weighed - General Gregson Ellis) were shot by two Guns:
George Macnaughton, keeper (4), and only guest, General Gregson Ellis (15). 
Heaviest, George Macnaughton, 17st. 2-lbs. Average of eighteen 14st. 4-lbs.  

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Over thirteen stalking days, 6 September to 12 October, twenty-five stags - Heaviest 16st. 12-lbs. Average 14st. 11-lbs. and thirty hinds, the latter not weighed or individually recorded, 
were shot by four guns:
Major Anstruther Grey (4), Mrs. Anstruther Grey (3), Hermione, Countess of Durham (2)
George Macnaughton (keeper/stalker) sixteen including two Switch.

Stalkers: George Macnaughton 
and twenty-four year old James Smith* for Major and Mrs. Anstruther Grey.

* James (Jimmy) Smith, 1931-2011, son of John and Jane Smith was brought up on Rum from the age of seven when his father, formerly a professional forester on the Rothiemurchus Estate, Aviemore, (Scotland), moved to the island with his family in 1938. Jimmy Smith remained on Rum until 1967. 
I had the pleasure of meeting Jimmy on a number of occasions, he was a mine of information, particularly as he could just remember Sir George Bullough and life on Rum through the war years and life after the transfer of the island to Nature Conservancy in 1957.
Jimmy's sister was married to Peter Wormell, first Nature Conservancy Warden on Rum.
I also had the pleasure of meeting the two sons of Duncan Macnaughton, both, 
like their father, keen 'pipers!

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The last Stalking Season before Lady Bullough and the Trustees of the Estate of the Late Sir George Bullough, Baronet, sold the 26,400 acre island, including Kinloch Castle, to the British Government for the peppercorn price of £23,000 on 28 February 1957, 
the date being the eighty-seventh anniversary of Sir George Bulloughs birthday
The island was placed in the care of the Nature Conservancy.

Over sixteen stalking days between 7 September and 7 October the five recorded Guns: 
Duncan Macnaughton (3), Mr. Robin Gray (3), George Macnaughton (16), Major Gray (2) 
and Simon Gray (3) shot twenty-seven stags - the heaviest 18st. 4-lbs, 
average weight 14st. 8½-lbs.,  plus 25 hinds, the latter not weighed or individually recorded. 
Stalkers: George Macnaughton and James Smith on three occasions, one each for Simon Gray, Major Gray and Robin Gray.

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Having taken over the management of Rum by the 28 February 1957 Deed of Sale from 
Lady Bullough and the Trustees of the Estate of the Late Sir George Bullough, Baronet
Nature Conservancy continued to record in the Isle of Rum Deer Forest Game Book stags 
and hinds shot each stalking season up to and including 1967, the year of Lady Bulloughs death.

THE NATURE CONSERVANCY SIGN: "WELCOME TO RHUM"


*   *   *   *   *   *   *   *   *   *   *   *   *   *   
In 1957 there were 1,600 red deer plus 2,000 sheep grazing on the island and a small herd of dairy cattle for provision of milk. The tenant farmer, Major Walter Mundell, was operating on a ten year tenancy agreement which commenced in 1947.

*   *   *   *   *   *   *   *   *   *   *   *   *   * 
1957 commenced on 10 August and concluded 15 September. Over twenty-two stalking days 
five guns are recorded as shooting thirty-seven stags, 
although the Summary states 39 Stags Shot (All Mature) 14st. 1½-lbs.
In addition 40 Hinds were shot their average weight 9st. 7½-lbs.

Guns: George Macnaughton - now head stalker and son of estate manager and former head stalker Duncan Macnaughton (18 including one with One Horn)
who retired and stayed on Rum
John C. Arbuthnott - as a chartered surveyor Nature Conservancy's Land Agent for Scotland at the time, succeeded his father as 16th Viscount Arbuthnott in 1966. (2), 
Pat Lowe - Nature Conservancy scientist (14 including one with One Horn)
Dr. W. Joe Eggerling - 
Nature Conservancy's Conservation Officer (Scotland), later Director of N.C. in Scotland (1).
Peter Wormell - First Nature Conservancy warden from 1957-1973, (2). 


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The first Season under Nature Conservancy management commenced on 4 July and concluded on 24 October. Over forty-four stalking days one hundred stags, (average weight of ninety-six recorded as 13st. 9-lbs.), were recorded shot by four Guns:
P. Lowe (13 including two in very poor condition), Peter Wormell - First Reserve Manager (3), 
George Macnaughton (55 including one with a deformed head”, one with only one horn, and two in very poor condition left on hill ), L. K. Stewart (29).

In addition 142 hinds were killed, the heaviest being 11st. 7-lbs., plus 85 old stags 13st. 13-lbs.



Average weights
120 old hinds 9st. 4-lbs.
135 young & old 9st 1-lb.

*

1 9 5 9  to  1 9 6 7    SEASON SUMMARIES RECORDED ONLY.
Lady Bullough died on 22 May 1967 aged ninety-eight.

All deer were shot by gamekeeper/stalkers, Duncan or George Macnaughton. 

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These huge numbers of both stags and hinds shot clearly indicate how overstocked relative to the available natural forage the island of Rum had biome. Add in 2,000 sheep, (there had been many more), of the tenant farmer, weather and location amongst other factors, it is no surprise there were so many “very weedy stags and hinds” recoded in the annual figures.

It was because Rum had become so denuded of grazing through the overstocking of competing species it was considered an ideal laboratory for research into rates of recovery / natural woodland regeneration by Nature Conservancy.  
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WRITTEN AND ILLUSTRATED FROM FIRST-HAND RESEARCH BY
GEORGE W. RANDALL  ©  COPYRIGHT

Completed 26 JANUARY 2022.